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(HOOGSTRATEN,D. VAN.)
Beschryving der heidensche goden en godinnen, getogen uit de Fabelschryveren en Oude Dichteren. Met printverbeeldingen gesiert.
Amsterdam, By Nicolaes ten Hoorn, 1716. 8vo. Frontispiece, (VIII),261,(31 index) p., 16 engraved plates. Paper wrapper. 17 cm An illustrated mythological manual (Details: Margins uncut. Frontispiece, dated 1715, by J. Goeree, depicting a portrait of 'Mater Deorum' within an architectural framework. On the title a woodcut printer's mark, showing a table/altar with an overload of symbols of the arts and the sciences, the motto: 'Ingenio et Industria'. The charming plates, which are not signed, offer all kinds of gods and mythological scenes) (Condition: Old marbled paper, probably from the original binding, reused for the covers. The back consists of a strip of modern stiff paper. Endpapers browned. Frontispiece dustsoiled and slightly foxed) (Note: The Dutchman David van Hoogstraten, 1658-1724, was a medical doctor and man of letters. He was a teacher at the Schola Latina of Amsterdam, and from 1694 till 1722 even conrector. He is best known for his Latin-Dutch dictionary of 1704, and for his translation of 'Ezopische fabelen' of Phaedrus, also of 1704. He translated also a number of Latin medical texts. He is further known for his Dutch and neolatin poetry. He published also on rhetoric and Dutch linguistics. This is the first edition of his handbook on classical mythology. The second edition dates from 1726. More editions followed in 1733, 1742 and 1761. Van Hoogstraten aims with his manual at people who are interested in mythology, but are not able to read Latin or Greek. (*2 recto: 'onbedreven in de Griexe en Latynsche sprake') He composed it, he says, at the request of the publisher. As starting point he took the successful 'Pantheum mythicum' of the French Jesuit François Pomey. His manual, written in Latin, al was by far the most popular and authoritative of the 17th century. (p. *2 verso) Van Hoogstraten translated the stories which were excerpted by Pomey into Dutch, but decided also to add a lot of material of his own, he tells. (p. *3 recto) For this additions he consulted Joachim Oudaen's 'Beschryving der Roomsche Mogentheit', and a work of the French author Gautruche on the same subject. He then warns young people, that if they want to write poetry, their efforts will fail, if they donot learn to understand mythological stories. These old stories contain hidden wisdom, and no poet and philospher can read without knowledge of mythological fables. (p. *4 recto) The study of these kind of stories, full of moral precepts, was even recommended by Plato to children. (p. *4 verso) The wisdom hidden under the mask of agreable stories enabled them to cope with the vicissitudes of fortune) (Collation: pi1 (frontispiece), *4, A-S8, V2) (Photographs on request) .
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Book number: 120085
€  90.00 [Appr.: US$ 101.95 | £UK 81.5 | JP¥ 11567]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Greek mythology Mythologie Mythos Roman mythology Schulbuch antike altertum antiquity griechische Mythologie mythology römische Mythologie schoolbook

 
(RAPIN,R.)
Observationes in poëmata Homeri et Virgilii, e Gallico latine redditae. (Jano Broukhusio interprete).
Utrecht (Trajecti ad Rhenum), Apud Franciscum Halma, Academ. Typogr. Ordinarium, 1684. 12mo. 128 p. Contemporary calf 17 cm (Ref: Schweiger 2,1247; Hoffmann 2,377; A. Grafton, The classical tradition, Cambr. Mass., p. 496) (Details: Gilt back with 5 raised bands, and a small red morocco shield in the second compartment, reading: 'Obs. in Hom. & Vir. Woodcut of two winged putti on the title) (Condition: Back rubbed, gilt fading away. 1 lower corner bumped. Old bibliographic inscription on the verso of the front flyleaf) (Note: René Rapin (Renatus Rapinus), 1621-1687, was a French Jesuit, who earned his fame as a Neolatin and French poet, and was called 'the second Theocritus'. Rapin also distinguished himself with his critical essays. Alongside Boileau he set forth the neo-classic canon of his age. (A.F.B. Clark, Boileau and the French classical critics in England (1660-1830), Paris 1925, p. 275/85). His celebrated Observations sur les poëmes d'Homère et de Virgile, (Paris 1669), earlier published in Paris as Comparaison des poëmes de Homère et de Virgile in 1664 (3rd ed.), is his best known treatise on literary criticism. It was even reprinted by Olms in 1973. This treatise is a contribution to the ongoing 17th century debate, the Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes, also known as the Battle of the Books, which found a kick-off at the beginning of the century in Italy with an attack on the admirers of the genius of Homer. It swung over to France in 1635. The main battle was launched in 1687 by Charles Perrault. In this debate the bad and raw taste of the epics of Homer was compared with the more refined taste of Virgil, and of contemporary French poets, who were considered by some to be superior to the ancients. René Rapin is cautious in this debate. He is not blind for the genius of Homer, but admires the propriety and eloquence of Virgil more. He concludes that Homerum plus habere ingenii, Virgilium plus judicii & delectus, that Homer has more genius, Virgil more judgement and power. The behaviour of Homeric Achilles is a danger for society, whereas Aeneas is useful and glorious. The reason for Homeric brutality, Rapin explains, is that there was not yet any idea of moral virtue in his days. The book of Rapin quickly found an English translation, which was published in London in 1670 and in 1672. The translation into Latin for the not French reading public, was made by Joh. Broukhusius. The Dutch biographer J.A. Worp observes in his praefatio to Jani Broukhusii epistolae selectae, Groningen, 1889, p. 8: Traiecti Broukhusius edidit versionem Latinam opusculi Gallico sermone scripti a Renato Rapino. This translation was reissued in 1704 by J. Palmerus in his Apologia pro Lucano, and in the Dissertationes selectae crit. de poetis graecis et latinis of I. Bergler, Leiden, 1707. The translator is the Dutch scholar/soldier Joan van Broekhuizen (Janus Broukhusius), 1649-1707, who during an adventurous life pursued his classical studies and poetry at leisure. In the same year he published his Carmina, a collection of his Neolatin poetry. (Utrecht 1684). His editions of Propertius (1702) and Tibullus (1707) laid the foundation for his reputation as a classical scholar. He was admired as a latinist, for his taste and for his erudition. (NNBW 4,309/12)) (Collation: A-E12 F4) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120478
€  300.00 [Appr.: US$ 339.82 | £UK 271.75 | JP¥ 38556]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Altertum Altertumswissenschaft Antike Antiquity Battle of the Books French literature Geschichte der klassischen Philologie Greek Homer Homerus Latin Querelle des Anciens et des Modernes Römische Vergil Vergilius Virgil Virgilius

 
(HOFFMANN, HEINRICH CARL GEORG).
Teutsche Volks-Geschichten, aus dem ersten Jahrhundert vor und nach Christi unsres Heilands Geburt.
Heidelberg, Bei Mohr & Winter, 1821. 8vo. VIII,342,(2 corrigenda) p., 10 engraved plates, 1 folding map. Hardbound. 24 cm (Ref: Holzmann/Bohatta IV, 10414 s.v. Volksgeschichten) An attempt of the Heidelberger 'Romantik' to build a national German character. (Details: Contemporary 'Pappband'. The 10 plates, mostly heroic scenes, were drawn by the author, 7 of which were etched by Bauch, and 3 by Schilbach. The map, which was also drawn by the author, is a lithography and shows boundaries in 7 watercolours) (Condition: Cover very worn at the extremities. Corners bumped. Head & tail of the spine damaged. Boards spotted. Partly foxed. Some pencil. Inscribed dedication on the front pastedown. A former owner has written in pencil on the title: 'Verf. Hoffmann, Heinr. Karl Georg') (Note: This title is a typical example of the German 'Romantik', showing the growing interest in the ancient roots of the Germans, and their 'Volksgeschichten'. The book, which was published anonymously, offers 'inter alia' also a long chapter on 'Die Befreiung Teutschlands durch Hermann den Cherusker'. Books like this were meant to entice the proponents of the Pan-German movement into a stronger sense of unity for a people that was hopelessly divided. § This title of 1821 is attributed by bibliographers to Heinrich Karl Hoffmann. A confirmation of this attribution we found in an announcement in the 'Neckar-Zeitung, no. 326, Mittwoch, 27. Nov. 1822', p. 1412: 'Heidelberg. Um vielfältigen Anfragen und Wünschen zu begegnen und zu entsprechen, erkläre ich hiemit öffentlich, dass ich gesonnen und entschlossen bin, als eine Fortsetzung der von mir herausgegebenen 'Teutschen Volksgeschichten aus dem ersten Jahrhundert vor und nach Christi Geburt', Heidelberg bei C.F. Winter 1821, auch die nachfolgenden Geschichten der Teutschen zu beschreiben. Es versteht sich von selbst, dass zwar der Geist und Zweck meiner Arbeit vollkommen sich gleich bleiben wird, demungeachtet die Art der Darstellung sich in die Eigenthümlichkeit des Gegenstandes fügen, und darum wohl da und dort andere Gestalt und Farbe annehmen muss. Auch jetzt bitte ich wieder, wie vor der Herausgabe des ersten Versuchs, alle Freunde der teutschen Geschichte, mich mit Rath und Hülfe zu unterstützen. (.). Darmstadt, den 11. Nov. 1822'. An earlier announcement of the same Hoffmann in the 'Allgemeine Zeitung, No. 49, Sonnabend, 24 März 1821', p. 195, proves that he is not the editor (Herausgeber), but the author of the collection: 'Ich habe (.) angekündigt, dass ich begonnen sey, die Geschichte unserer Vorfahren vor der Völkerwanderung, mit Bildern verziert, (.) zu schreiben. (.) unter dem Titel Teutsche Volks-geschichte aus dem ersten Jahrhundert vor und nach Christi Geburt'. He has two objectives (zwiefachen Absicht) for this publication, he declares, first it is his aim to present to the uneducated and uninformed German public a mirror that reflects its original simple and sound identity, and secondly he aims at making the history of the German people relevant to their lives. § The liberal revolutionary nationalist Heinrich Karl Hofmann (1795-1845) studied law at the University of Heidelberg, and later worked as a lawyer for the Hessian state government at Darmstadt. Hermann Haupt published in 1912 a biography of him: 'Heinrich Karl Hofmann, ein süddeutscher Vorkämpfer des deutschen Einheitsgedanken', Heidelberg, C. Winter. Hofmann was also closely connected with the ' Vormärz', and a protagonist of the Darmstadt Blacks. § The 'akademische Buchhandlung und Verlag' established in 1801 by Jacob Benjamin Mohr has become famous as the Press of the 'Heidelberger Romantik'. The firm published i.a. 'Des Knaben Wunderhorn' by Achim von Arnim and Clemens Brentano Görres' 'Teutsche Volksbücher' and many more titles which are still read today. In 1815 Christian Friedrich Winter, 1773-1858, an old friend of Mohr, joined as a partner. The cooperation lasted till 1822. Christian Winter was a radical liberal, whose name is closely connected with the 'Vormärz' period and the Revolution of 1848/49. In 1845 he was elected 'Bürgermeister' of Heidelberg) (Provenance: Interesting provenance. On the front pastedown a handwritten dedication by one of the publishers, Christian Friedrich Winter. The dedicatee is 'Herrn Minister General v. Schaefer'. The text reads: 'Seiner Excellenz, dem hochverehrten teutschen Krieger und biedern Vertheidiger des Rechts und der Wahrheit, Herrn Minister General v. Schaefer, mit offener Verehrung, der Verleger C. Winter'. This is Konrad Rüdolf Freiherr von Schäffer, 1770-1833. He was an old war-horse, who fought many battles, first against and later with the French. Since 1814 he was Grand-ducal lieutenant-general of Baden, and head of the 'Kriegsministerium' of the 'Kabinet Winter', (of Ludwig Georg Winter) from 1831 till 1833. At the bottom the signature of Christian Winter) (Collation: *-4, 1 - 21-8, 22-4) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 140095
€  230.00 [Appr.: US$ 260.53 | £UK 208.25 | JP¥ 29560]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Altertum Antike Antiquity Baden Christian Winter Deutsche Geschichte Deutschland German history German imprints Germanen Germans Germany Heidelberg Heinrich Karl Georg Hoffmann Hessen Romantik romanticism

 
AELIANUS.
Aeliani Variae Historiae libri XIIII. Item Rerumpublicarum descriptiones ex Heraclide, interprete Iusto Vulteio Wetterano. Editio postrema, ad Graecum exemplar, multo quam antehac emendatius, nunc denuo quam diligentissime recognita.
N.pl. (Geneva), Apud Ioan. Tornaesium, 1600. 12mo. 224,(16 index) p. Vellum 12 cm (Ref: cf. GLN-4111. Not in Hoffmann, Brunet, Ebert, Graesse, Dibdin, Moss, and even not in in Cartier 'Bibliographie des éditions des De Tournes') (Details: 2 thongs laced through the joints. Gilt title shield on the spine. Title with woodcut garland borders. Edges dyed red. § Latin translation only) (Condition: Four not objectionable pinpoint holes near the rear joint of the spine) (Note: The best known work of Claudius Aelianus, A.D. 170-235, is his 'Variae Historiae', a collection of excerpts and anecdotes of a moralizing nature, dealing with human life and history. The Suda mentions Aelianus' reputation of Attic purity. His works were much used by Christian writers. The publishing firm of the De Tournes in Lyon, and later Geneva, produced in 60 years at least 10 (pocket) editions of Aelianus' 'Variae Historiae'. The first 4 editions of De Tournes, (1553, 1558, 1567, 1577) contain the Latin translation of Justus Vulteius (or Vultejus) only. This remained the standard translation for long time. (Neue Pauly Suppl. 2, p. 7) The last 6 editions (1587, 1604, 1600, 1610, 1612, 1613) contain the Greek text (published previously by Conrad Gesner in 1566) with the facing translation of Vulteius. The German philologist and paedagogus Justus Vultejus, 1529-1574, studied in Wittenberg under Melanchthon. In Basel he translated in 1548 for the publisher Johannes Oporinus the 'Variae Historiae' for the first time into Latin. (On Vulteius see ADB 40, 391/2) The publisher Jean de Tournes of Lyon (Johannes Tornaesius) adopted this translation of 1548 for his editions of Aelianus. Remarkable about the edition of 1600 is that there are two versions. First there is a Greek/Latin edition (= GLN-4111): 'Aeliani Variae historiae libri XIIII. Rerumpublicarum descriptiones ex Heraclide. Cum Latina interpretatione Justi Vulterii Wetter. Editio postrema, multo quam antehac emendatior, (Genève), Apud Joannem Tornaesium, 1600, (16),461,(19) p. Then there is this edition. De Tournes published in 1600 also a Latin translation only edition of the 'Variae Historiae'. The woodcut border of the titlepage of both editions is similar, its text differs of course. (See for the Greek/Latin edition of 1600, including a photograph of the title page, the site of 'GLN 15-16' at number GLN-4111) This Latin translation only of 1600 seems rather rare. It is not to be found in the usual works of reference, and not even in Cartier. In KVK (Karlsruher Virtueller Katalog), we found a few copies in Italian, Swiss, French and German libraries) (Collation: A - P-8) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120027
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Aelianus Greek literature Griechische Literatur Latin translation Swiss imprints Variae Historiae anecdotes antike altertum antiquity

 
AELIANUS.
KL. AILIANOU SOPHISTOU POIKILÊ HISTORIA. Cl. Aeliani Sophistae Varia Historia, ad MStos codices nunc primum recognita & castigata, cum versione Justi Vulteji, sed innumeris in locis ad Graecum auctoris contextum emendata, et perpetuo commentario Jacobi Perizonii. (Tomus I: libri I-VIII).
Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Joannem Du Vivie, Isaacum Severinum, 1701. 8vo. (LXVI),522 p., frontispiece. Vellum. 20 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,12; Dibdin 1,230/1; Brunet 1,62) (Details: Volume 1 (of two) only, contains the praefatio of 66 p. and the books I-VIII) Frontispiece depicting 14 scenes from the Histories. Title in red and black. Engraved printer's mark on the title, with a motto reading: Ars usu, studio, sapientia, crescit. Greek text with facing Latin translation, and on the lower part of the page the commentary.) (Condition: Vellum soiled, scratched and worn at the extremes. Both pastedowns loose. Lacking volume 2) (Note: The best known work of Claudius Aelianus, A.D. 170-235, is his Variae Historiae, a collection of excerpts and anecdotes of a moralizing nature, which are about human life and history. The Suda mentions his reputation of Attic purity. His works were much used by Christian writers. § The editor of this Aelianus edition is the Dutch classical scholar Jacobus Perizonius, 1651-1715, who was called to Leyden in 1693, and appointed professor of History. Perizonius' 'best work as an editor is his recension of Aelian's Varia Historia'. (Sandys, II, p. 330/331). To improve the text he used besides manuscripts the editio princeps of 1545 and the edition with the notes of Gesner (1610). He also improved the Latin translation of Vulteius 'so dass diese für eine neue gelten kann'. (Hoffmann 1,12). In the English summary of his thesis Meijer observes, that in his writings Perizonius 'proves himself to be a surprisingly modern historian. In his tendency towards an all-encompassing history, from Babylon until modern times, in his use of non-literary sources, but especially in his estimation of cultural history . Perzionius is far in advance of his time' (Th.J. Meier, Kritiek als herwaardering. Het levenswerk van Jacob Perizonius (1651-1715), Leiden 1971, p. 245/6). See also for a discussion on the worth and aim of this edition of the Varia Historia, Meier p. 125/131) (Collation: vol. 1: *-4*8, 5*2 (minus blank leaf 5*2); A-2I8, 2K8 (leaf K6 blank; including the last blank leaves 2K7 & 2K8)) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 130002
€  60.00 [Appr.: US$ 67.96 | £UK 54.5 | JP¥ 7711]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Aelianus Greek literature Griechische Literatur Variae Historiae anecdotes antike altertum antiquity

 
DEMOSTHENES & AESCHINES.
Demosthenis et Aeschinis Mutuae accusationes de ementita Legatione, et de Corona, ac contra Timarchum quinque numero, cum earum argumentis, ipsorum oratorum vita, et Aeschinis Epistola ad Athenienses, ac indice copioso. Nuper a bene docto viro traductae. Dictorum series versa pagina conintetur. Cum Privilegio Veneto.
Venice (Venetiis), Apud Hieronymum Scotum, 1545. 223,(1 blank) leaves. Limp overlapping vellum. 16 cm (Ref: Edit16 CNCE 16736; Hoffmann 1,528) (Details: Latin translation only. 5 thongs laced through the joints. Woodcut printer's mark on the title and the verso of the last leaf blank, depicting a branch of olive and a palm tree, graft onto trunk, with between them an anchor; anchor and trunk are held together bij the initials SOS (Signum Octaviani Scoti); a banner runs around with the motto: 'In tenebris fulget'. Printed in italis, except for the title. Some historiated and ornamental woodcut initials) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned and slightly soiled. 2 tiny holes in both boards, because of the 2 ties which have disappeared) (Note: In the preface of this book the learned anonymous translator explains his readers that it was his aim to collect for those who are not able to read Greek (qui graeca non legerant) in one volume (in unum eundemque codicem ac seorsum ab reliquis) five speeches, translated into Latin, of Demosthenes and Aeschines, because those speeches, full of mutual accusations and attacks, belonged together (inter se sint connexae (.) ut una ab altera divelli non possit). They shared the same actors and the same subject matter, and showed to the consent of all, the power of speech, and the art of oratory in her perfection (tota ars dicendi & vis orandi). Demosthenes and Aeschines were at daggers drawn, and therefore the collections begins with the 'Contra Timarchum oratio', because this speech was the beginning of their enmity (quod inde Demosthenis & Aeschinis inimicitiae exordium habuerint). In this preface he severely criticizes the clumsy Latin translation of Leonardus Aretinus (Leonardo Aretino, known to us also as Leonardo Bruni, ca. 1370-1444). He calls his translations 'mendosae' and unreliable. The anonymous translator not only translated speeches of Demosthenes and Aeschines, he added also relevant material from other sources, such as Libanius, Philostratus, and Apollonius, which he now translates into Latin for the first time (adiunctis tam Libanii quam aliorum argumentis ad eas ipsas orationes). (Interpres lectori S.P.D., leaf 2/3) Translated are beside Aeschines' 'Contra Timarchum Oratio', the 'Oratio de ementita legatione' of Demosthenes and Aeschines, now commonly known as 'De falsa legatione', and the 'Oratio contra Ctesiphontem de Corona', and the 'Oratio de Corona pro Ctesiphonte' of both men. Added are biographic sketches, argumenta and testimonia. § The Athenian Demosthenes, 384-322 BC, was without doubt the greatest orator of his time. His surviving speeches are mostly connected with his politics. He was a fierce opponent of Philippus II, king of Macedon since 359, who gradually tried to subject the whole of Greece. In 351 he delivered his first Philippic, against him. His speeches against Philippus, known as Philippics, are one long warning against the growing Macedonian power. Demosthenes attacked also the pro-Macedonian elements in Athens, who sought peace with Philippus, and wanted to give in. One of their leaders was the orator Aeschines, 389-314 BC. In 345 Demosthenes and his Athenian ally Timarchus tried to impeach in a speech, called 'De falsa legatione' or 'On the false embassy', Aeschines 'for wilfully neglecting the interest of Athens as a member of the embassy which had negociated the peace' (H.J. Rose, A handbook of Greek literature, London 1965, p. 291). Demosthenes held Aeschines responsible for Philip's use of the peace negotiations to intervene in other Greek city-states. Demosthenes was unsuccessful and Aeschines was acquitted, having delivered a speech in which he defends himself against accusations of treason and collusion with the enemy. Instead of refuting the accusations directly, Aeschines used Athenian Civil Procedure to argue against Timarchus as a qualified prosecutor. The feud reached its peak in 330 with Demosthenes' most famous oratorical effort, the so-called speech 'On the Crown'. A member of his party, Ctesiphon, had proposed in 336 to honor Demosthenes for his services, as was customary, with a golden crown. Nothing came of it the next 6 years, mainly because Aeschines accused Ctesiphon of legal irregularities, but in effect he attacked Demosthenes' policy. In 330, after a charge of Aeschines, 'Demosthenes replied in the masterpiece, commonly known in modern times as the 'De Corona'. It is partly a formal rebuttal of the charge against Ktesiphon, but this is the weakest part of it, for technically Aischines had the law on his side. Substantially, it is a magnificent defence of the principles guiding the anti-Macedonian party, justifying them in face of failure. Less to modern taste is its bitter personal attack on Aischines, who however had not spared Demosthenes in his own speech'. (Rose, p. 292)) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf in pencil '7 januari 1961', written by the Flemish linguist Walter Couvreur, 1914-1996, who was an Orientalist, and professor of Indoeuropean linguistics at the University of Gent. It indicates the date of aquisition. The place of acquisition he wrote on the flyleaf at the end: 'Turijn, Bottega d'Erasmo') (Collation: A-2E8, pagination sometimes irregular) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120062
€  1600.00 [Appr.: US$ 1812.36 | £UK 1448.5 | JP¥ 205633]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Aeschines Aischines Athen Athens De Corona Demosthenes Greek history Greek literature Griechische Literatur Latin translation only Macedonia Philippicae Philippus antike altertum antiquity griechische Geschichte

 
ALSTORPHIUS,J.
Joannis Alstorphii J.U.D. Dissertatio philologica De lectis. Subjicitur ejusdem De lecticis veterum diatribe.
Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud Joannem Wolters, 1704. 12mo. (XX),(4 blank),334,(2 blank),(22)(2 blank) p., 16 plates, most folding, 1 text engraving. Vellum. 14 cm (Ref: Brunet 6,29001; Welcome 2,37) (Details: Back with 4 raised bands, and a green morocco shield; 2 thongs laced through the joints; title in red & black; engraved printer's mark on the title, depicting a burning candle, the motto is 'aliis inserviendo cunsumor') (Condition: Waterstain in the margin of the first and last 2 leaves of the first gathering; 2 very small and hardly objectionable wormholes right on the front joint, not affecting any other part of the book. Small stamp of a coat of arms on verso of the title) (Note: The first large scale investigation on the subject of beds and litters of the Greeks and Romans. The 'lectus' or in Greek 'klinê' was in antiquity a piece of furniture, for sitting, resting, sleeping and also for banqueting. It often decorated the rooms of the wealthy for posh parties. Johan Alstorph, the author of this book, was born ca. 1680 in Groningen, studied in Harderwijk, and died in 1719, (Pökel p. 8). He defended his dissertatio de lectis in 1700, and his diatribe de lecticis in 1701 'sub praesidio (.) D. Theodori Jansoni ab Almeloveen', professor Greek and medicine at the University of Harderwijk, 1697-1712, best known for his editions of Hippocrates, Coelius Aurelianus and Strabo. The dissertation was enlarged and revised by Alstorph for this publication of 1704 after the return to his hometown Groningen. We suppose that Van Almeloveen acted as middleman for this edition, for the publisher Wolters was a relative of his mother. To thank him Alstorph send Wolters a barrel of Groningen beer. Alstorph states in his 'dissertatio' that it is the first large scale investigation on the subject of beds and litters of the Greeks and Romans, and the customs related to them. The plates depict reclining chairs/seats, a cradle, a sickbed, deathbed, and different chairs; there is even an engraving of the Last Supper, with the apostles lying relaxed left and right of Christ on reclining seats. In 1701 Alstorph was promoted 'Juris Utriusque Doctor'. Alstorph's work on lances and spears, 'de hastis veterum opus posthumum, nunc primum in lucem editum cum multis tabularum aenearum iconibus' was posthumously published in 1757) (Provenance: The small shield on the verso of the title shows 3 oblique bars, with 3, 2, and 1 star in the compartments) (Collation: *12 (leaf *11 & *12 blank); A-P12 (leaf O12 & P12 blank) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120023
€  260.00 [Appr.: US$ 294.51 | £UK 235.5 | JP¥ 33415]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) alte Geschichte ancient history antike altertum antiquity classical archaeology classical art & archaeology furniture klassische Archäologie klassische Kunst und Archäologie

 
AMMONIUS.
AMMÔNIOU peri Homoiôn kai Diaphorôn lekseôn. De adfinium vocabulorum differentia. Accedunt opuscula nondum edita, Eranius Philo 'de Differentia Significationis'. Lesbonax 'de figuris grammaticis'. Incerti scriptores 'de soloecismo & barbarismo'. Lexicon 'de spiritibus dictionum, ex operibus' Tryphonis, Choerobosci, Theodoriti, etc. selectum. Ammonium, ope MS. primae editionis Aldinae, & aliunde, emaculavit & notis illustravit, reliqua ex codd. MSS. Bibliothecae Lugduno-Batavae nunc primum vulgavit Ludovicus Casparus Valckenaer. (Bound with:) Ludov. Casp. Valckenaer. Animadversionum ad Ammonium grammaticum libri tres. In quibus veterum scriptorum loca tentantur & emendantur. Accedit specimen scholiorum ad Homerum ineditorum, ex codice Vossiano Bibliothecae Lugduno-Batavae.
Leiden (Lugduno Batavorum), Apud Johannem Luzac, 1739. 8vo. 2 volumes in 1: (VIII),XXXI,(3),264; (VIII),249,(15 index),(2 blank) p. Vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,125; Brunet 1,239; Ebert 536; Graesse 1,105) (Details: Six thongs laced through the joints. Both titles printed in red & black. Engraved printer's mark on title, designed by F. v. Bleyswyck, depicting a ship heading for Scylla and Charybdis; its motto: 'nec dextrorsum, nec sinistrorsum', or 'Neither to the right nor to the left', referring to Deuteronomium ch. V,32/33: 'Custodite igitur et facite quae praecepit Dominus Deus vobis: non declinabitis neque ad dexteram, neque ad sinistram: sed per viam, quam praecepit Dominus Deus vester, ambulabitis, ut vivatis, et bene sit vobis, et protelentur dies in terra possesionis vestrae') (Condition: Vellum age-tanned and slightly soiled. Small name on the title. Old ink inscription on the front flyleaf. Front hinge cracking, but strong; paper of pastedowns cracking) (Note: The Frisian scholar Lodewijk Caspar Valckenaer, 1715-1785, was a pupil of his fellow Frisian Tiberius Hemsterhuis, and after him the greatest Dutch classical scholar of the 18th century. Hemsterhuis, 1685-1766, advised his students in Franeker and later in Leiden, to use especially the lexica of the ancient lexicographers. These works could be of great use for the understanding of textual problems and for the amending of texts of classical authors, and they were of great help to gain a profound knowledge of the Greek language and its vocabulary. For his first fruits Valckenaer chose an unpublished work of the Greek grammarian Ammonius, who lived probably in the first or second century A.D. This edition, the 'editio princeps' of 'De adfinium vocabulorum differentia' made his name. In the preface Valckenaer explains that Ammonius suffered grievous wrongs at the hand of French scholar/printer Henri Estienne who ignored his usefulness in the appendix of his celebrated 'Thesaurus Linguae Graecae' (1572), and who vexed and lacerated him in the preface of his 'De Atticae linguae seu dialecti idiomatis' (1573), and portrayed the ancient lexicographer as a careless ignoramus. ('omnibus modis Ammonium vexavit, & tam contumeliose laceravit, ut, in Ammonio exemplum & incuriae & inscitiae ponendum esse'. Praefatio p. XXV) Young Valckenaer announces that he is going to repair this 'gravissimam iniuriam'. For Valckenaer it is clear (liquido constet), that Ammonius penetrated deep into the nature of the Greek language and the true origin of words. (in interiorem Linguae indolem & veram vocum originem reliquis grammaticis omnibus ignoratam, sese penetravisse Ammonium') (Idem, eodem) The first part consists of the work of Ammonius and several other unpublished ancient grammatici, the second part consists of Valckenaer's notes on Ammonius, and a specimen of the scholia from the 'codex Vossianus'. The untertaking proved to be successful, because it resulted in his appointment as professor of Greek at the University of Franeker in 1741. (Gerretzen, Schola Hemsterhusiana, 1940, p. 205/6) (Collation: *-5*4, A-2K4; +4, A-2K4 (leaf 2K4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Ammonios Ammonius De adfinium vocabulorum differentia Greek grammar Sprachwissenschaft Valckenaer editio princeps griechische Grammatik linguistics

 
ANTONINUS, MARCUS AURELIUS.
MARKOU ANTÔNINOU AUTOKRATOROS TÔN EIS HEAUTON BIBLIA 12. Marci Antonini Imperatoris eorum quae ad seipsum libri XII. Post Gatakerum, ceterosque recogniti, et notis illustrati; a doctissimo viro R.I. Oxoniensi.
Glasgow (Glasguae), In aedibus Academicis excudebat R. Foulis Academiae Typographus, 1744. 8vo. (IV),128;214,(10 index) p. Contemporary vellum 16.5 cm (Ref: Gaskell 44; Hoffmann I,187; Dibdin 1,269 & 270; cf. Moss 1,58 for the edition of 1704: 'an excellent edition'. Brunet 1,328; Ebert 740; Graesse 1,152) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Marbled endpapers) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned and spotted. Bookplate on the front pastedown. A small portrait of Marcus Aurelius clipped out of an Italian magazine pasted on the verso of the front flyleaf. Small wormhole in the gutter of the front pastedown and front flyleaf, not reaching the title. Paper slightly yellowing. Gaskell calls for a pi-gathering of two leaves containing advertisements of the Foulis Press at the beginning of the second part, but these advertisements were omitted by the binder of this volume) (Note: The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, 121-180 A.D., is one of the saints of Stoicism. During his military campaigns he wrote in solitude a kind of philosophic diary for his private guidance. It came into circulation only after his death, and gave him eternal fame. 'With the exception of the first book, in which he records his gratitude to his family, to his teachers, and to the gods, these aphorisms and reflections are arranged in no systematic order, and are often concise to the point of obscurity'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 153). The collection is called Mediationes, in Latin Ad se ipsum. It was a kind of philosophic breviary throughout the centuries, even for contemplative Christians. The fact that Marcus had much in common with a religion he despised 'shows how the atmosphere of the world was changing. Classical thought was departing and giving place to what was to be the medieval mind' observes H.J. Rose. (H.J. Rose, Handbook of Greek literature, Londen, 1965, p. 411) The reputation of the modest English cleric and great classical scholar Thomas Gataker, 1574-1654, who never aspired an academic post, rests on his edition of the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, published in 1652 in Cambridge. It comprised the Greek text, a Latin translation and a very substantial commentary, filling 439 pages. That edition has been praised by later editors as a 'judicious and masculine performance (about which) it is difficult to speak with sober moderation' (Farquharson p. XLIV) and as an 'édition monumental' (Hadot, p. CC). Ingram Bywater described it as a 'book of unquestioned value and authority'. (DBC 2,359/361) § This 1744 edition is a repetition of the Oxfordian edition of 1704, which was, omitting Gataker's notes, a reissue of the edition of 1697. The editor R.I is according to Copac one Richard Ibbetson, who was a Fellow of Oriel College in Oxford, later rector at Lambeth. He died in 1731. The editions of 1704 and 1744 do not contain the commentary of Gataker, but they offer 82 pages with Ibbetson's concise notes. Sources for his notes were Gataker, Casaubon, Dacier and others.Foulis repeated this edition in 1751) (Provenance: Bookplate of 'P.A. Kasteel'. Petrus Albertus Kasteel, 1901-2003, was a wellknown Dutch journalist, civil servant and diplomat. He wrote his name also on the front flyleaf. (See (www).parlementairdocumentatiecentrum.nl/id/vgw8es9od2p6) § On the front flyleaf also: 'John Knott, M.D., Dec. 21 1899'. § At the upper edge of page 1 of the first part the manuscript name: 'Daniel O'Connell, Dublin'. This is probably the famous Irishman Daniel O'Connell, 1775-1847, often referred to as The Liberator or The Emancipator. The writing is a little insecure, the name was probably written when O'Connell was old. O'Connell was an Irish political leader who campaigned for Catholic emancipation, including the right for Catholics to sit in the Westminster Parliament, denied for over 100 years, and for the repeal of the Act of Union which combined Great Britain and Ireland. There have been erected in Ireland many monuments and statues in honour of him. O'Connell's philosophy and career have inspired leaders all over the world, including Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King. He was told by W.M. Thackeray "you have done more for your nation than any man since Washington ever did." Gladstone described him as "the greatest popular leader the world has ever seen." (Source Wikipedia)) (Collation: pi2, A-Q4; A-2E4) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120413
€  320.00 [Appr.: US$ 362.47 | £UK 289.75 | JP¥ 41127]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Greek literature Griechische Literatur Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Stoa Stoicismus ancient philosophy antike Philosophie antike altertum antiquity stoicism

 
APPIANUS.
Appianus Alexandrinus De bellis civilibus Romanorum. Cum libro perquam eleganti, qui Illyrius, et altero qui Celticus inscribitur. (Translated from the Greek into Latin by Petrus Candidus)
(Venice), n.d. (Colophon at the end: Venetiis opera magistri Bernardini de Vitalibus, 1526, die quarto mensis Madii). 8vo. 372 unnumbered leaves. Modern overlapping vellum 14.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann I,216; EDIT16: CNCE 2197; Graesse 1,169; cf. Ebert 849) (Details: Title within woodcut floral borders; short title on the back; good white paper) (Condition: Good condition; old and small ownership entry on the title) (Note: Appianus, 2nd century AD, originating from Alexandria, gained Roman citizenship, and went to Rome. There he was a lawyer, and wrote his 'Roman History' in Greek (Rhômaïka). It treated the Roman conquests arranged ethnographically in 24 books. 'Loyal and honest, an admirer of Roman imperialism, he wrote in the plain koinê, and though interested mainly in wars and unreliable about Republican institutions and conditions, preserves much valuable material'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 87) The Greek text was first published in 1551 in Paris, by Carolus Stephanus. The first publication of any of the works of Appian however was the Latin translation by Pier Candido Decembrio, (in latin Petrus Candidus) dating from 1472. It was apparantly a success, because it was repeated in 1477, 1492, 1494, 1495. 1499. 1500 and 1526. The Latin translation deals with the part on the Civil Wars (5 books), and offers also a 'liber illyricus', 'liber celticus', 'liber lybicus', 'liber syrius', 'liber parthicus', & 'liber mithridaticus'. This translation of 1526 is a reissue of the edition of 1500, also published in Venice. The translation of Candidus is not without value. Graesse 1,169: 'Cette version (Candidus' translation of 1472) est très importante pour la critique du texte, le traducteur s'étant servi d'un manuscrit assez correct et l'ayant traduit presque littéralement'. Ebert criticizes its style, he calls the translation obscure and bombastic, but he also underlines its critical value. (Ebert 849) Pier Candido Decembrio, born in 1399 in Pavia, was a well-known Italian Renaissance humanist, prolific author, and classical scholar. He was secretary to Filippo Maria Visconti, Duke of Milan for thirty years, from 1450 'magister brevium' to Pope Nicholas V, and later to Pius II. The translation of Appianus was commissioned by Pope Nicholas V, after Candido's arrival in 1450 in Rome. Candidus, who had been a pupil of the Greek refugee Manuel Chrysoloars, is best known for his translation of the Republic of Plato, which he completed in 1440. He died in Milan in 1477) (Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani - Volume 33 (1987)) (Provenance: In ink on the title 'Da commudidade de Bellem', an ownership entry of the Jerónimos Monastery, or Royal Monastery of Santa Maria de Belém in Lisbon, founded in 1501. The monastery has been dissolved in 1833. Its building is now an important architectural monument. On the internet we found only 2 books with this entry/provenance, in Portuguese libraries) (Collation: a-z8, &8, ?8, R8, A-C8, aa-rr8, 2s4) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120002
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Appian Appianus Bellum Civile Greek literature Griechische Literatur Roman history antike altertum antiquity römische Geschichte

 
ARISTAENETUS.
Aristaeneti Epistolae graecae cum versione latina et notis Josiae Merceri curante Joan. Cornelio de Pauw, cujus notae accedunt.
Utrecht (Trajecti ad Rhenum), Apud Hermannum Besseling, 1737. 4to. (XXIV),287,(1 colophon) p. Overlapping vellum 15.5 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,240; Schweiger 1,44; Dibdin 1,292; Fabricius, Bibliotheca Graeca, ed. 4a, Hamburg 1780, p. 696; Brunet 1,448; Ebert 1066; Graesse 1,204) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Title printed in red and black. Woodcut ornament on the title. Greek text with facing Latin translation, commentary on the lower half of the page. Edges dyed blue) (Condition: Vellum slightly soiled. Stamp and name on the front flyleaf. Small part of the right lower corner of the front flyleaf cut off, and renewed. Small shelf number in red ink on the title. Two stamps on the verso of the title) (Note: A survey of erotic motives in the literature of Greece and Rome. Aristaenetus is the established name of the author of a collection of love letters in two books, probably from the beginning of the 6th century AD. It survives only in one Codex, of which the first folio with the name of the real author is lacking. Aristaenetus (Bestpraiseworthy) is only applied to the sender of the first letter. This is clearly a case of an imaginary letter-writer. The sources used are Plato, Menander, Lucianus, Alciphron, Philostratus, the ancient novels, and love elegies of Callimachus. Aristaenetus draws however in a conventional way a veil over too explicit love-making. The collection is a kind of survey of erotic motives in the literature of Greece and Rome. Everyting erotic however is covered with a veil of prudery. Aristaenetus ends after some cuddling before the bedroom is entered. (Neue Pauly, 1,1087) The collection was allready attributed to Aristaenetus in the 'editio princeps' of Antwerp 1566, edited by J. Sambucus. An edition with a Latin translation was published in 1595 in Paris by Iosias Mercier, the 4th edition of which dates from 1639. Mercier was the first to observe that the first letter of the collection was imagined to have been written by one Aristaenetus, and that the collection belonged to the genre of imaginative epistolography. Aristaenetus had to wait almost a century for the next edition, which appeared in 1736 in Utrecht, produced by Jacobus van Lanckom. Exactly the same edition was brought on the market by the Utrecht publisher Hermannus Besseling, only the impressum on the title differs, the rest is exactly the same. It was said that Aristaenetus was put to sleep in the commentary of Pauw. A revised edition was published in Zwolle in 1749. Cornelis de Pauw, born ca. 1680 in Utrecht, was canon of the 'Sint Jan'. He was a classical scholar of some repute, and published several editions of Greek and Roman authors, Hephaestion, Horapollo, Anacreon, Quintus Smyrnaeus, Theophrastus's Characters, Phrynichus, Aeschylus. By some detractors he was considered to be an 'homme médiocrement savant', whose ignorance was only exceeded by his impudence. He died in 1749) (Provenance: On the front flyleaf a stamp: 'Prof.Dr. Joh. Irmscher, Berlin NO 55, Erich-Weinert-Strasse 126'. Johannes Irmscher, born in Dresden 1920, was a classical philologist and byzantine scholar, who made his carreer in the DDR. He died in 2000. On the same flyleaf also in ink: 'C. Schoenemannus, Isleb. 1782'. This book once belonged to the German classical scholar and geographer Karl Traugott Gottlob Schoenemann, born in Eisleben in 1765. He studied classical philology and ancient geography in Göttingen. In 1787 and 1788 he published the treatises 'De geographia Homeri' and 'De geographia Argonautarum' . He died prematurely in 1802. Posterity is still thankful for his 'Bibliotheca historico-litteraria patrum latinorum a Tertulliano usque ad Gregorium M. et Isidorum Hispalensem' (1792/94), a still indespensable work of reference for early Christian Latin literature, from Tertullian to Isidor of Sevilla. On the title in red ink: 'Ph.H. 85'. On the verso of the title a round stamp of: 'Biblioth. Gymn. Ill. Gothana'. This stamps dates from before 1859. In that year the local 'Gymnasium Illustre' and the 'Herzogliches Realgymnasium' were transformed into the 'Gymnasium Ernestinum Gotha'. (See Wikipedia 'Ernestinum Gotha') (Collation: *8, 2*4, A-S4) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120031
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Aristaenetus Briefe Correspondence Epistulae Greek literature Griechische Literatur Letters antike altertum antiquity

 
ARISTAENETUS.
ARISTAINETOU EPISTOLAI. Aristaeneti Epistolae graecae. Cum latina interpretatione & notis. Altera editio emendatior & auctior.
Paris (Parisiis), Apud Marcum Orry, via Iacobaea, sub signo leonis salientis, 1600. 8vo. (VIII),282,(2 animadvertenda),(4 blank) p. Limp vellum 18 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,239; Graesse 1,204; Ebert 1065) (Details: Among bibliographers and librarians there is confusion about the date of this book. The date on the title of this second edition of the letters of Aristaenetus is indicated as MVIC. We found in KVK (Karlsruher Virtueller Katalog) records of this title dated 1594, 1596 and 1600. 1594 is definitely wrong, for the Parisian printer Orry published the first edition of this title in 1595, indicated by him as MDLXXXXV, and he repeated it the next year, now with MDXXXXVI. The third edition was published in 1610, with the date MCX. As the second edition cannot preceed the first edition of 1595 (and its repetition of 1596), this second edition comes between 1596 and 1610, so these very unusual Roman numerals MVID (1000, 6, 500) might well mean 1600. § 2 thongs laced through the joints. The boards and the back have blind-tooled double fillet borders. All 3 edges gilt. On the title the printer's mark of Orry, depicting a jumping lion on his way to the top of a steep mountain, where a crown of stars awaits him; the motto is: 'Virtus ad astra per aspera'. Greek text with facing Latin translation) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned and slightly spotted. All 4 ties gone. 1 very tiny hole in the upper board. Small bookplate on the front pastedown. Inscription on the front flyleaf. Small strip of the upper margin of the title, with an owner's inscription, torn off, and repaired. Two other old owner's inscriptions on the title, and an owner once added in ink the name of the editor of Aristaenetus '(Josiae) Mercerii Des Bordes'. Lower margin stained in places. Some old annotations & underlinings. A small wormhole in the blank lower margin of the last gathering) (Note: Aristaenetus is the established name of the author of a collection of love letters in two books, probably from the beginning of the 6th century AD. It survives only in one Codex, of which the first folio with the name of the real author is lacking. Aristaenetus (Bestpraiseworthy) is only applied to the sender of the first letter. This is clearly a case of an imaginary letter-writer. The sources used are Plato, Menander, Lucianus, Alciphron, Philostratus, the ancient novels, and love elegies of Callimachus. Aristaenetus draws however in a conventional way a veil over too explicit love-making. The collection is a kind of survey of erotic motives in the literature of Greece and Rome. Everyting erotic however is covered with a veil of prudery. Aristaenetus ends after some cuddling before the bedroom is entered. (Neue Pauly, 1,1087) The collection was allready attributed to Aristaenetus in the 'editio princeps' of Antwerp 1566, edited by J. Sambucus. An (first) edition with a Latin translation was published in 1595 in Paris by Josias Mercier des Bordes. Sometimes this edition and the second edition of 1600 is erroneously attributed to the French scholar Jacques Bongars, 1554-1612. This cannot be correct, for the editor dedicates his Aristaenetus in the 'dedicatio', dated 1595, to Jacobus Bongarsius, whom he thanks for his great support. ('Aristaenetum mitto te tandem, ut liberem fidem dudum obligatam tibi, qui mihi edendi auctor praecipuus.' (p. â2 recto) Mercier was the first to observe that the first letter of the collection was imagined to have been written by one Aristaenetus, and that the collection belonged to the genre of imaginative epistolography. (See p. 198/99 of this edition of 1600) This book on offer is the second revised and augmented edition. Besides the text and translation it offers ca. 90 pages commentary. (Much more on this French calvinist nobleman and scholar, who died in 1626, in 'L'Histoire de La Norville' by l'abbé A.E. Genty (1885), online available at the 'Cercle Généalogique Norvillois')(Provenance: On the front pastedown the bookplate of the Dutch Jewish physican and famous bookcollector Bob Luza, 1893-1980, who survived Bergen-Belsen, and whose library was auctioned in 1981 by Van Gendt. Depicted is a book with the initials 'B.L.' on the upper board, together with the wellknown symbol of the rod of Asclepius, in the background a burning sun. (See for Luza, P.J. Buijnsters, 'Geschiedenis van de Nederlandse bibliofilie', Nijmegen 2010, p. 274-76) § On the title the traces of a name at the upper edge. Below the imprint: 'Radulphi Fornerii J.U.D. Aurelii'. Raoul Fornier, or latinized Radulphus Fornerius, 1562-1627, sieur de Rondau, and 'Juris Utriusque Doctor' at Orléans, was like his father Guillielmus Fornerius, professor of law at the University of Orléans at the end of the 16th century. His best known work is 'Rerum quotidianarum libri sex. Quorum tres posteriores nunc primum in lucem prodeunt. In quibus plerique tum juris utriusque, tum variorum auctorum loci vel illustrantur, vel emendantur, multa etiam ad antiquitatis studium pertinentia tractantur. Auctore Radulpho Fornerio Gul. F. antecessore Aurelio'. It was first published in Paris in 1600. The 4th edition dates from 1644. This work is a proof of his excellent knowledge of Latin. He suggested a number of sound emendations and elucidated obscure passages) (Collation: a4; A-R8, S4, T4 (last 2 leaves blank) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120141
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ARISTOPHANES.
ARISTOPHANOUS KÔMÔiDIAI ia'. Comoediae undecim, graecè & latinè, ut et Fragmenta earum quae amissae sunt. Cum emendationibus virorum doctorum, praecipue Josephi Scaligeri, cum indice Paroemiarum selectiorum. Accesserunt huic editioni notae & observationes ex variis autoribus collectae, ut et nova versio EKKLÊSIAZOUSÔN à Tan. Fabro facta cum doctissimis ejusdem in eandem comoediam notis.
Amsterdam (Amstelaedami), Apud Joannem Ravesteinium, 1670. 12mo. 2 parts in 1: (XXIV),1087 (recte 1089),(3 blank),60 p. Vellum. 13.8 cm (Ref: Smitskamp, the Scaliger collection, no. 6; Hoffmann 1,255; Hoffmann 1,255; Dibdin, 1,299; Moss 1,94; Ebert 1091; Graesse 1,207; Brunet 1,453) (Details: 5 thongs laced through the joints. Woodcut printer's mark on the title, depicting the prophet Elijah resting against a tree and being fed by the ravens. This scene is described in the Old Testament in book 1 Kings, chapter 17, vss. 1-4, where the Septuagint speaks of 'korakes', ravens that feed Elijah. This is of course an allusion to the printer's name Ravestein. The entrepreneur's motto is 'Exspectando', 'in expectancy'. The title is preceded by an engraved title/frontispiece, designed by P.van Somer. On it a round portrait of Aristophanes on a pedestal, which is flanked by Pallas Athena and Hermes. Greek text with facing Latin translation. The last 60 pages have their own half title: 'Aristophanis Fragmenta a G. Cantero iam pridem collecta; cum praefatione V.C. Andreae Schotti; recognita vero plurimum et non parva accessione loculpletata a G. Goddaeo') (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. Lower margin of the frontispiece and the title slightly cut short. Paper slightly yellowing) (Note: Of the Greek comic playwright Aristophanes, ca. 455-385 BC, born in the radical democracy of Athens, survive 11 plays. In a less free society his genre became obsolete in his own time, and was later replaced by the harmless plays of Menander. 'Aristophanes' comic mode- a dramatic free form with an almost improvisational feel, great poetic and linguistic inventiveness, highly topical satire (public figures being named and personated on stage), and obscenity, beyond almost any subsequent standard of acceptability'- never agian became a major theatrical tradition'. (The classical tradition, Cambridge Mass., 2010, p. 69) This opinion seems outdated. Aristophanes sounds very much like modern satyric comedy. He seems to be the creator of his own genre. The 2nd edition of the OCD, 40 years older, sound more sympathetic. 'He had a keen eye and ear for the absurd, and the pompous; his favoured media are parody, satire, and exaggeration to the point of phantasy, and his favourite targets are men prominent in politics, contemporary poets, musicians, scientists and philosophers, and (.) for a wide public'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 113) That is more like it. His plays are not books, but are more like libretti for stage performances. 'Every comedy is indeed a 'libretto' or rather a work of thought designed for theatrical performance'. (C.F. Russo. 'Aristophanes an author for the stage', London/New York, 1994, p. XI) Serious scholarly work on the text of Aristophanes begins in the 16th century, with Petrus Victorius, J.J. Scaliger and his friend Willem Canter. An new edition with Scaliger's notes was published posthumously in 1624 by Maire in Leiden. That Scaliger, a man with a sharp tongue, and who had loads of ennemies, was an admirer of the comic playwright is no wonder. The following epigram can be read in the introduction to Scaliger's text of 1624: 'Ut templum Charites quod non labatur, haberent,/ invenere tuum pectus Aristophanes'. (The Graces have found for themselves a temple that would not fall down, your breast, Aristophanes') This 1670 edition is compiled chiefly from the earlier edition of 1624, and contains also notes on the 'Ecclesiazusae' by the French scholar Tanaquil Faber, 1615-1672) (Collation: *8, A-2E12, 2F6 (leaf 2F6 verso blank), 2G6, 2H-2Z12, 3A6 (leaf 3A5 verso blank, leaf 3A6 blank), A-B12, C6) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120016
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Aristophanes Greek literature Griechische Literatur Komödie. antike altertum antiquity comedy

 
ARISTOPHANES.
ARISTOPHANOUS PLOUTOS. Aristophanis comoedia Plutus. Aiecta sunt scholia vetusta. Recognovit ad veteres membranas, variis lectionibus ac notis instruxit, et scholiastas locupletavit Tiberius Hemsterhuis.
Harlingen (Harlingae), Ex officina Volkeri van der Plaats, 1744. 8vo. (XXIV),484,(25 index),(3 blank) p. Vellum 20 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,260; Dibdin 1,306; Moss 1,97/98; Brunet 1,456: 'édition estimée'; Ebert 1099; Graesse 1,208) (Details: Greek text accompanied by scholia and commentary. Short title in ink on the back) (Condition: Vellum age toned and soiled. Small paper label pasted on the back. Front joint partly split. Paper yellowing. Pinpoint wormhole in the lower part of the first 130 p., sometimes nibbling at a letter) (Note: Of the Greek comic playwright Aristophanes, ca. 455-385 BC, born in the radical democracy of Athens, survive 11 plays. In a less free society his genre became obsolete in his own time, and was later replaced by the harmless plays of Menander. 'Aristophanes' comic mode- a dramatic free form with an almost improvisational feel, great poetic and linguistic inventiveness, highly topical satire (public figures being named and personated on stage), and obscenity, beyond almost any subsequent standard of acceptability'- never again became a major theatrical tradition'. (The classical tradition, Cambridge Mass., 2010, p. 69) This opinion seems outdated. Aristophanes sounds very much like modern satyric comedy. The 2nd edition of the OCD, 40 years older, sounds more sympathetic: 'He had a keen eye and ear for the absurd, and the pompous; his favoured media are parody, satire, and exaggeration to the point of phantasy, and his favourite targets are men prominent in politics, contemporary poets, musicians, scientists and philosophers'. (OCD 2nd ed. p. 113) § Serious scholarly work on the text of Aristophanes begins in the 16th century, with Petrus Victorius, J.J. Scaliger and his friend Willem Canter. This edition of Aristophanes play Plutus of 1744 was produced by the Dutch classical scholar Tiberius Hemsterhuis, 1685-1766, who at 19 became professor at the Athenaeum of Amsterdam. In 1705 Hemsterhuis was promoted to a professorship in Harderwijk, and in 1717 he was appointed professor of Greek at the University of Franeker. In 1740 he was finally called to Leiden. Hemsterhuis' Plutus edition, a play in which the god of wealth is cured of his blindness, and the remarkable social consequences of his new discrimination are exemplified, is 'one of the most accurate and critical editions of a Greek writer, ever published. It contains the genuine ancient Scholia, and the notes are every way worthy of the high reputation of Hemsterhusius. No subsequent editor has presumed on a publication of the Plutus, without consulting this masterly performance'. (Didbin) Gudeman calls the edition even 'epochemachend' (A. Gudeman, Grundriss der Geschichte der klassischen Philologie, Lpz., 1909, p. 202) Hemsterhuis himself is more modest about his 'libellus', it may be small and of little value, nevertheless it very well serves the purpose of introducing students to the treasures of Greek. ('sed peridoneus tamen, ex quo juvenes humanitatis excolendae cupidi veteres illas, atque ab ipsa velut natura profectas Atticorum elegantias percipiant'. (Preface p. V) The importance of the edition lies in the addition and treatment of the scholia. Hemsterhuis stresses that the scholia are not all the same (unius auctoris, ejusdem pretii), the student should be aware of what is old and what is recent, what is genuine and spurious, what is valuable and worthless, (ut ipsi tirones intelligerent in studiorum vestibulo, quanti sit vetusta a recentioribus, a genuinis spuria, aurea a quocumque deterioris metalli genere secerni'. (Preface p. XII) (J.G. Gerretzen,'Schola Hemsterhusiana', Nijmegen/Utrecht, 1940, p. 88/90)) (Provenance: Name on the front pastedown: 'L. Rutgers') (Collation: *-3*4, A-3S4 (leaf 3S3 verso and 3S4 blank)) (Photographs on request)
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ARISTOTELES.
Aristotelis Politicorum libri octo ex Dion. Lambini & Pet. Victorii interpretationibus puriss. graecolatini, Theod. Zvingeri Argumentis atque Scholiis, Tabulis quinetiam in tres priores libros illustrati, Victorii commentariis perpetuis declarati, Pythagoreorum veterum Fragmenta politica, a Io. Spondano conversa & emendata. Index rerum & verborum pleniss.
Basle (Basileae), Eusebii Episcopii opera ac impensa, 1582. Folio. (XX),623,(12 index),(1 printer's mark) p. Modern calf 35.5 cm (Details: Nice copy, bound in modern full (red)brown calf, with 5 raised bands on the back. Spine short title in gilt: 'ARISTOTELIS / DE REPVBLICA'. Text in three columns, with the Greek in the centre flanked by the Latin translations of Piero Vettori and Denys Lambin respectively on each side. Large printer's woodcut device to the title and last page, depicting a bust of 'Hermes triceps' (three-headed Hermes) on a pillar; each of the heads wears a winged helmet; the middle Hermes holds in his right hand a caduceus, and in his left a bishop's staff (Episcopius!); from the pillar seems to hang a chopped off head. Large historiated woodcut letter on leaf a2, woodcut letters of various sizes throughout the text. Wide margins) (Condition: First and last leaf dust-soiled. Small and faint name on the title. Paper yellowing. Small bookplate on the front pastedown. 2 bookplates on the lower pastedown) (Note: The Greek scholar/philosopher Aristotle, 384-322 B.C., is one of the foremost names in the history of thought, and perhaps the most influential of all who have ever written. His influence on Werstern science and culture is immense. His boundless industry extended to most branches of higher learning. 74 treatises, genuine and spurious, have come down to us under his name. His 'Politics', literally 'the things concerning the polis', is among his best known and most widely read works. It embraces in 8 books the historical, theoretical and practical aspect of politics. To Aristotle 'politics were the very crown of philosophical study (.) and the ultimate end of the State to provide an environment in which those capable of the highest mental and moral development might attain thereto. (.) The important sections of this great work are the sketch of the ideal state, (.) the account of the various forms of government (.) the discussions of sovranty and responsibility and of kingship'. (H.J. Rose, 'A handbook of Greek literature', Oxford, 1965, p. 276) § This Basle edition of 1582 of the Politics adopts the Greek text, Latin translation and the famous commentary, earlier published by the Italian scholar Piero Vettori (Petrus Victorius), 1499-1585, at Florence in 1576. Vettori, professor of Greek and Latin in the 'Studio Fiorentino' at Florence, was the greatest Italian Greek scholar of his time. His best known works in the field of Greek philology are his commentaries on Aristotle's Rhetoric (1548), Poetics (1560), Politics (1576) and Nicomachean Ethics (1584). Every chapter (caput) in this Politics edition of 1582 is printed separately, followed by Vettori's very extensive and rich commentary. The Greek text is flanked by 2 Latin translations, one of Vettori, and one which the French scholar and Royal Reader in Greek, Denys Lambin (Dionysius Lambinus), 1520-1572, had published in Paris in 1567. Added to the chapters are, hot from the press, the notes and diagrams of the Basle professor of Greek and Moral philosophy Theodor Zwinger, (Theodorus Zuingerus), 1533-1588. He is best known for his editions of the Nicomachean Ethics (Basle 1566) and the Politica of Aristotle (Basle 1582), in which he transformed these works in a series of diagrams, analysing and showing their structures in systematic tables. Appended are the 'Pythagoreorum fragmenta politica' in the edition of the French scholar Jean de Sponde, or Johannes Spondanus, 1557-1595) (Provenance: Bookplates of: 'United Presbyterian Church. 'Brown library'. Glasgow, 66 Virginia St.' and of 'United Presbyterian College. Brown-Lindsay Library. Shelfmark 3C1.1 No. 5154'. § Small bookplate 'Bibliotheca Classica Stephaniana' of the Swedish classical scholar Staffan Fogelmark on the front pastedown. Fogelmark was Reader in Greek, 1972-85 at Lund University; Lecturer in Greek, 1985-96. University of Gothenburg: Professor of Greek, 1997-2004) (Ref: VD16 A 3582 & VD16 P 5468. Bibliotheca Bibliographica Aureliana 38, no. 108.655; Hoffmann 1,294. Griechischer Geist aus Basler Pressen no, 129. Ebert 1166; Graesse 1,214. Adams A 1914. Moss 1,129; Not in Brunet) (Collation: alpha6, beta4, a-z6, A-2G6,) (Photographs on request) (Heavy book, may require extra shipping costs)
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Book number: 79269
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Greek literature Greek philosophy Greek text Griechische Literatur Lambinus Latin translation Politica Politics Swiss imprints antike altertum antiquity griechische Philosophie

 
ARISTOTELES.
Aristotelis, ac philosophorum medicorumque complurium Problemata, ad varias quaestiones cognoscendas admodum digna & ad naturalem philosophiam discutiendam, maxime spectantia. Marci Antonii Zimarae Sanctipetrinatis Problemata his addita, una cum trecentis Aristotelis et Averrois Propositionibus, suis in locis insertis. Omnia iam tertiò edita. Cum privilegio.
Basel, (Basileae), (R. Winter), n.d. (ca. 1540). Small 8vo. 126,(2 blank) p. 20th century brown morocco 15 cm 'A Pseudo-Aristotelian text which offered its readers of all levels the satisfation of a causal understanding of daily phenomena' (Ref: VD16 P 4881; Not in USTC) (Details: Tasteful brown morocco, boards with a blind fillet border. The name of Aristotle gilt on the back. The edges of the bookblock are also gilt. The 'Problematum liber unus' by Marcus Antonius Zimara (filling 55 pages) which the title calls for, is unfortunately lacking at the end of this book. Nevertheless this is a remarkably fresh copy in a tasteful binding) (Condition: A faint and small waterstain at the right margin of the title, and the lower margin of the last leaf) (Note: 'The Aristotelian corpus not only established for some 2 millenia the definitions and standards for many branches in the natural sciences, but also founded a genre that respected neither the disciplinary boundaries nor the systematic presentations for which Aristotle is famous'. So, for instance, Aristotle's 'Problemata', a work composed in question-and-answer format, spawned a vigorous tradition of imitations, promising 'authorative philosophical, that is, causal, understanding, made pleasant through the variety and familiarity of the phenomena they explained'. (Ann Blair, 'The Problemata as a natural philosophical genre', in 'Natural Particulars: Nature and the Disciplines in Renaissance Europe', edited by A. Grafton & N. Siraisi, Cambridge MA, MIT, 1999, p. 170) Blair distinguishes in the Renaissance concerning the Problemata 'a high' or learned, and a 'low', and more popular career, ranging from erudite folio editions with commentary, to inexpensive editions of Problems of more recent composition. 'This eminently versatile genre offered its readers of all levels the satisfation of a causal understanding of daily phenomena and the pleasure of a varied accumulation of natural philosophical tidbits'. (Idem, p. 172). This Basle edition forms part of the low career of the Problemata tradition. It is a 'collection of problems first composed anonymously in Latin in the thirteenth or fourteenth century, probably in the German area; it is extant in some twenty medieval manuscripts and over one hundred printed edtions through the modern early period. (.) It uses the classic form to discuss largely medical topics, and appropriates the very same title as 'real' 'Problemata Aristotelis'. (Idem, p. 181) So this collection bears only a very vague relation to what we consider to be Aristotle's 'Problemata'. It is distinguished from Aristotle's work by the incipit 'Omnes homines' (naturaliter scire desiderant). The low tradition is with its ca. 250 questions also much shorter than the learned one, which numbers ca. 900 questions. Later on the low tradition received accretions of various kinds in the same strain, works of modern authors such as Marco Antonio Zimara. This Problemata text of the low tradition was incredibly popular in the 16th century. It is, as the title suggests, a collection of all kinds of problems and petty facts on biology, natural history and medicin. The sources are e.g. Galenus, Hippocrates, Boethius, Albertus Magnus et alii, including of course Aristotle, who's works seems to be the main source. The arrangement is the same as in Aristotle's Problemata, a question is asked (dioti/quaeritur/why), and an answer (ê hoti/respondetur/it is because) is given. The problems are on hair (e.g. 'ut dicit Albertus (Magnus), si pilus mulieris menstruosae ponatur sub fimo, ex illo generatur serpens venenosus', p. 7), on the head, the eyes, the nose, ears, mouth, teeth, tongue, palatum, neck, arms, hands, nails, breast, mammae, the heart, stomach, blood, urine, fur, spleen, intercourse, sperm, conception, children, etc. etc. In the early modern period many translations and adaptations of the low tradition were published, no doubt because of the prominence of questions about sex. 'Conception, birth, menstruation and lactation, gender differences of all kinds are one of the prime emphases of the 'Omnes homines' editions'. (Idem, p. 187) The high tradition of Aristotle's Problemata did finally decline in the 17th century, as the genre was gradually undermined by scepticism and the scientific revolution of that age. But the 'Omnes homines' editions continued to appear for another half century. 'By the late 17th century what had once been a respectable medieval compilation had moved increasingly down the market, most noticeably in German and English versions'. (Idem, p. 187) The vernacular editions of the Questions and Answers were bound with 'farmer's almanacs and home medical guides'. (Idem, ibidem) § We could not find out on which earlier edition this third edition (Omnia iam tertio edita) that was produced by Robertus Winter, was based. At any rate, it seems the earliest appearance of this title. We found no earlier one. Winter produced another edition in 1544. The book seems to be rare. We found only a few copies in KVK, and none in Rare Book Hub, formerly Americana Exchange) (Collation: a-h8, (leaf h8 blank) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120205
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ARNOBIUS.
Arnobii Disputationum adversus gentes libri septem, recogniti & aucti. Ex bibliotheca Theodori Canteri Ultraiectini, cuius etiam notae adiectae sunt.
Antwerpen (Antverpiae), Ex officina Christophori Plantini, 1582. 8vo. 285,(1 errata, & 2 blank) p. Tasteful modern half calf. 18 cm (Ref: Belg. Typ. 172; STC Dutch p. 14; Adams A1996; Voet 596 variant A; Sorgeloos 113; Dibdin 1,215: 'An excellent edition, in which the modesty and learning of its editor are successfully opposed to the rashness of his predecessor Gelenius' (in his edition of 1546); Ebert 1219; not in Brunet) (Details: Woodcut printer's device on the title. Red morocco letterpiece on the back. The binder used a broad strip of vellum as spine lining; this strip was probably cut from an old manuscript contract) (Condition: Name on the title. Very small tear near the right lower corner of the title. Occasional old ink underlinings on ca. 70 pages. Right margin of the last 60 pages slightly waterstained, the last gathering however more so) (Note: Arnobius, a teacher of rhetoric at Sicca Veneria in Numidia, 'was suddenly converted to Christianity (ca. A.D. 295) and a year or two later, at the instance of his bishop, he wrote seven books 'Adversus Nationes', 'Against the Pagans'. 'His work throws light on the Christian-pagan debate immediately before the Great Persecution, while the venom of his attack on traditional Roman paganism shows that this was by no means dead'. (OCD 2nd edition p. 122) His style is easy-flowing. Arnobius makes little use of the New, and none of the Old Testament. His view of God is platonic. The unintended side effect of the efforts of Arnobius and other Church Fathers to ridicule or crush paganism, was that their writings form an archive which preserves knowledge and practices of polytheism in the years of its decline in late antiquity. § Just as the early christians bolstered their piety by contrasting it with the demonic foulness of pagan religion, so the protestants of the 16th century used their knowledge of pagan idolatry to scourge their catholic adversaries. Critics of Catholicism, like Calvin, compared catholic mass e.g. with the bloody rituals of the pagans, and used the sacrifices of the ancients to score theological points against their opponents. 'Protestants detected in the Catholic cult of images, the pagan idols so well described by late antique critics like Arnobius'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 678, s.v. Paganism) The work of Arnobius was first published in Rome in 1542 (although the preface is dated 1543). Other editions followed in 1546, 1560 and 1580. Our edition of 1582 was produced by the Dutch scholar Theodorus Canterus (Dirk Canter), 1545-1617. He followed the edition of Gelenius of 1546, who sometimes rewrote the text 'ope ingenii' to make difficult passages intelligible. Canterus inserts some modifications of his own, and returns for readings to the 'editio princeps' of 1542, edited by Faustus Sabaeus. This was a wise policy and a sensible thing to do. Canter's textual and exegetical notes appear as endnotes. (See for Canter and his Arnobius edition 'History of Scholarship: A Selection of Papers from the Seminar on the History of Scholarship Held Annually at the Warburg Institute', edited by Christopher Ligota, Jean-Louis Quantin. Oxford University Press, 2006, page 97-100). § The history of classical philology saw strange creatures, and Dirk Canter sure was one. He was the brother of the great classical scholar Willem Canter, studied classics in Paris under Lambinus, but was the rest of his life primarily a political and religious adventurer in his hometown, the city of Utrecht. He was there mayor, political agitator, religious opportunist and extremist, a conspirator to overthrow the government of the city to seize power. He was banished in 1611. Still he managed to find time to produce this excellent scholarly edition and other philological work, such as 'Variarum lectionum libri duo', Antwerp 1574) (NNBW 1,558) (Provenance: the signature on the first and last page is probably of a member of the Soissy family, originating from the Champagne) (Collation: A-S8 (leaf S8 blank) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 130068
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ARNOBIUS.- MEURSIUS,J.
Ioannis Meursii Criticus Arnobianus tributus in libros septem. Item Hypocriticus Minutianus, & Excerpta MS. Regii Parisiensis. Editio altera, & melior.
Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Ludovici Elzevirii, 1599. 8vo. (XX),167,(23)(1 blank) Vellum 16 cm (Ref: Dibdin 1,215: 'an indispensable work to peruse, for those who are curious in the learning of the author'; Willems 44; Rahir 26; Berghman 1283; Schoenemann 1,166/67) (Details: 5 thongs laced through both joints; colophon at the end: 'Lugduni Batavorum, Excudebat Ioannes Balduini. Anno 1599, mense Julio') (Condition: Short title in ink on the back; vellum somewhat soiled; 2 hardly noticeable pinpoint wormholes in the first 6 leaves; some foxing; name on front flyleaf erased, leaving a small hole) (Note: Arnobius, a teacher of rhetoric at Sicca Veneria in Numidia 'was suddenly converted to Christianity (ca. A.D. 295) and a year or 2 later, at the instance of his bishop, wrote seven books 'Adversus Nationes', Against the Pagans. His work throws light on the Christian-pagan debate immediately before the Great Persecution, while the venom of his attack on traditional Roman paganism shows that this was by no means dead'. (OCD 2nd edition p. 122) His style is easy-flowing. Arnobius makes little use of the New, and none of the Old Testament. His view of God is platonic. The unintended side effect of the efforts Arnobius and other Church Fathers to ridicule or crush paganism, was that their writings form an archive which preserves knowledge and practices of polytheism in the years of its decline in late antiquity. Just as the early christians bolstered their piety by contrasting it with the demonic foulness of pagan religion, so the protestants of the 16th century used their knowledge of pagan idolatry to scourge their catholic adversaries. Critics of Catholicism, like Calvin, compared catholic mass e.g. with the bloody rituals of the pagans, and used the sacrifices of the ancients to score theological points against their opponents. 'Protestants detected in the Catholic cult of images, the pagan idols so well described by late antique critics like Arnobius'. (The Classical Tradition, Cambr. Mass., 2010, p. 678, s.v. Paganism) The work of Arnobius was first published in Rome in1542 (although the preface is dated 1543), containing as Book Eight the 'Octavius' of Minucius Felix. Other editions followed in 1546, 1560, 1580, 1582, 1583 & 1586. Joannes Meursius, or in Dutch 'Jan de Meurs', 1579-1639, was only 19 years old when he published the first edition of this celebrated 'Criticus Arnobianus' in Leyden in 1598. He studied under the genius J.J. Scaliger, who helped him to publish it. It was a work of philology and not of theology, and it enjoyed a mixed reception. Schoeneman observes that the book showed indeed the 'acumen' of the author's genius, but that it is more on others classical authors than on Arnobius and Minucius Felix. Meursius offers for the greater part animadversions, critical notes, conjectures and emendations. He did not consult manuscripts, but used his 'ingenium'. The next year, 1599, Elsevier published this second improved edition of the 'Criticus Arnobianus'. It was not 'augmented', as is usual with second editions, on the contrary, Meursius wisely cut a number of his rasher suggestions. In 1610 Meursius became professor of Greek at his own university. There, in Leyden, he produced the 'editiones principes' of a number of Byzantine authors, the 'editio princeps' of the 'Elementa Harmonica' of Aristoxenus (1616), and edited the 'Timaeus' of Plato with the commentary and translation of Chalcidius (1617). He wrote much on the antiquities of Athens and Attica. (J.E. Sandys, 'A history of classical scholarship', 1964, p. 311)) (Provenance: On the front pastedown in pencil the name of 'J.A. Dijck') (Collation: +12 (minus leaf +11 & +12), A - M8 (leaf M8 verso blank)(Photographs on request)
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Book number: 120114
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Arnobius Latin literature Minucius Felix Paganismus Spätantike antike altertum antiquity early christian literature early christianity frühchristliche Literatur frühes Christentum late antiquity paganism römische Literatur

 
ARRIANUS.
Arriani De expedit. Alex. Magni Historiarum libri VII. Ejusdem Indica. Ex Bonavent. Vulcanii Brug. interpretatione. Nicolaus Blancardus e veteribus libris recensuit, versionem latinam emendavit, octo libros animadversionum adjecit.
Amsterdam (Amstelodami), Apud Joannem Janssonium à Waesberge, & viduam Elizaei Weyerstraet, 1668. 8vo. (XVI),617,(1 blank),(34 index),(1),(1 blank) p. Engraved frontispiece and portrait. Calf 19.5 cm (Ref: STCN ppn 844195553; Hoffmann 1,377; Brunet 1,497; Dibdin 1,329: 'great merit'; Moss 1,188; Graesse 1,227) (Details: Greek text and Latin translation. Back gilt and with 5 raised bands, Black shield in the second compartment. Boards with gilt borders. Marbled endpapers. Frontispiece, depicting Alexander the Great on a throne, conquered kings bow for him. The portrait of Nicolaus Blancardus is engraved after a painting of Willem Eversdyck (now in the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam) of 1666, made when Nicolaas was 42. Blancardus (who was married with Maria Eversdyck, a sister of Willem) is indicated in the text beneath his portrait: 'Medicus et Illustrium Zelandiae Ordd. Historicus'. The text is printed in 2 columns, Greek with facing Latin translation; on the lower part of the page are the notes of Blancardus. At the end have been added 22 pages with 'Photii Patriachae Constantinopolitani ex Arrianis scriptis eclogae, Andrea Schotto interprete') (Condition: Binding rubbed and scratched, front joint split, but still strong. Bookplate on the front pastedown. Paper yellowing) (Note: The Greek historian, soldier and politician Flavius Arrianus of Nicomedia, second century A.D, was a pupil of the philosopher Epictetus, whose 'Discourses' he preserved, and 'whose teaching reinforced his natural sense and honesty'. (OCD 2nd ed., p. 122/23) He wrote a history of Parthia, and a history of Alexander the Great's successors, works of which only fragments survive. Arrianus principal work is his 'Anabasis', describing the history of Alexander the Great. He gave this history probably the title 'Anabasis Alexandrou'. It is the best account of Alexander's campaign antiquity has left us. For his sources of Alexander and his expedition Arrianus relied on the accounts written by Alexander's men, especially Ptolemy I and also Aristobulus. Arrianus' sober narrative, written in very tolerable and readable imitation Attic, is the basis of Alexander's history, a welcome contrast to the romanticism, the slander, the absurd stories. (.) He is not a compiler, but a real historian who tried to go to the best sources; he illustrates Polybius' dictum that only men of action could write history'. (Idem, ibidem) The 'Indike', or 'Indica' is an account of India, and of Nearchus' report of his voyage from the Indus river to the Persian gulf after the Indian campaign of Alexander. Nearchus was one of the officers of Alexander. § The Flemish scholar Bonaventura Vulcanius (De Smet) of Bruges, 1538-1614, professor of Greek at the newly founded university of Leiden from 1588, produced editions of Arrian (Geneva 1575, with a Latin translation), Callimachus (Leiden 1584) and Apuleius (Leiden 1594). Among his pupils were Hugo Grotius and Daniel Heinsius. Vulcanius' Arrianus is the first critical and scholarly edition. He was attracted to Arrianus for the purity of his language, (ob Graeci sermonis puritatem) § Vulcanius' edition and translation were revised by the Dutch scholar Nicolaas Blanckaert (Blankaart), latinized as Nicolaus Blancardus, 1624-1703. 'In den Noten hat er stillschweigend Freinsheim, Salmasius u.a. benutzt'. (Hoffmann) Blancardus studied in his hometown Leiden classics, oriental languages and history. His association with the French scholar Claude Saumaise (Salmasius), who lectured in Leiden from 1631 till 1650 as a successor of Scaliger, was important for his education. Blancardus went to Middelburg in 1650 to teach at the newly founded 'Illustre school'. In Middelburg he was also appointed official historian of the province Zeeland. The school was no success and was closed down in 1666. In the meantime Blancardus had studied medicin, and in 1664 taken his doctor's degree in Harderwijk with a dissertation 'De peste'. Blancardus moved to Friesland and became in 1669 professor of Greek at the Frisian University of Franeker. Blancardus published also an edition of Q. Curtius Rufus' 'Historiae Alexandri Magni', of the Roman historian Florus, and besides Arrianus' Anabasis of 1668, Arrianus' minor military and geographic works, including the 'Enchiridion' of Epictetus. (Leiden 1683) (NNBW 4,154/55) (Provenance: On the front pastedown the booklabel of one 'J.R.P. Forrest, Edinburgh') (Collation: *8, A-2S8 (minus blank leaf 2S8; 2S7 verso blank. Portrait bound before leaf A1)) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 130067
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Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Alexander Magnus Alexander der Grosse Alexander the Great Arrianus Greek history Greek literature Griechische Literatur India Latin translation Nearchus anabasis griechische Geschichte

 
ATHENAGORAS.
Sancti Athenagorae Atheniensis Philosophi Legatio pro Christianis ad Imperatores M. Aurelium Antoninum, & L. Aurelium Commodum. Ejusdem de Resurrectione mortuorum. Accedunt Latina versio, emendationes, variantes lectiones, annotationes, atque indices necessarii. Cura & studio Eduardi Dechair, A.M.
Oxford (Oxoniae), E Theatro Sheldoniano, 1706. 4to. (XVI),219,(1 blank); 127,(1 blank),(8 index) p. Vellum. 20.5 cm (Ref: ESTC No. T222099; Neue Pauly, Supplement 2 p. 86; Dibdin 1,186: 'a very elaborate edition of Athenagoras (that) does great honour to the learning and industry of the editor'; Hoffmann 1,400; Brunet 1,537; Ebert 1321; Graesse 1,245) (Details: 6 thongs laced through the joints. 2 titles, the first completely in Greek type, the second in Latin. On the first title an engraving of the Sheldonian theatre. Printed in 2 columns, Greek text with parallel Latin translation. The second part of the book consists of the 'Suffidi Petri annotationes in Athenagorae Legationem', and 'Langi annotationes', and the notes of Koltholtius 'et alii') (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. 2 small ownership inscriptions on the front flyleaf) (Note: Athenagoras of Athens, a converted pagan philosopher, was a Christian apologist who addressed between 176 and 180 AD an apology, called 'presbeia' (legatio) to the emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (died 180) and Commodus (appointed 176), in which he refuted traditional charges against the Christians, of atheism, canibalism, and incest. Athenagoras is considered to be the most eloquent of the Greek apologists. His 'Legatio' is in the form of a speech composed according to the rules of Greek rhetoric. Through his wide reading in pagan literature he had a good grip of Greek philosophy and religion. He used technical philosophic terms that were current among educated pagans. His style is elegant, 'free from superfluous expressions, forcible and at times rising to great heights of descriptive power. His arrangements of material is always clear and his argument moves forward quietly and majestically. Even when apparent irrelevant mythological references are introduced they are made to serve Athenagoras' purpose of holding the hearers'and readers' attention and providing interesting information'. (L.W. Barnard, 'Athenagoras: A Study in Second Century Christian Apologetic', Paris 1972, p. 32) 'The second treatise of Athenagoras 'On the Resurrection of the Dead' concerns an idea that was revolting and impossible in the eyes of pagans, who believed that the body after its dissolution couldnot be restored to its former state. § Athenagoras was edited by the English scholar Edward Dechair, Magister Artium, and Canon of St. Paul in London. He adopted the Greek text of Henricus Stephanus (1557), 'qui omnium accuratissimus nobis videbatur'. (Lectori, p. a4 verso) Dechair collated for this edition also 2 Bodleian manuscripts. He added to this Greek text the corrected Latin translations of Gesner (Legatio), and Petrus Nannius ((de Ressurectione) which had previously been published in 1565 and in 1541. (Lectori p. b1 recto) For the notes he excerpted, he says, earlier work of the leading scholars Suffridus, Langus, Kortholt and Rechenberg. In his notes he incorporated also material of a scholiast, found in a Parisian manuscript, and for various readings in an Etonian manuscript he was indebted to the English scholar William Worth, 1677-1742) (Provenance: A first ownership entry dated 1825, the second reads: 'Oxford 2-3-1963, J.S.S') (Collation: a-b4; A-Z4, Aa-Dd4, Ee2 (leaf Ee2 verso blank), *A-*R4)) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 152317
€  290.00 [Appr.: US$ 328.49 | £UK 262.75 | JP¥ 37271]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Altertum Altertumswissenschaft Altphilologie Antike Antiquity Greek literature Griechische Literatur Patristics Patristik Spätantike classical philology early christian early christianity frühchristliche frühes Christentum late a

 
APOLLODORUS ATHENIENSIS.
Apollodori Atheniensis Bibliothecae libri tres, et fragmenta. Curis secundis illustravit Chr.G. Heyne. (Bound with:) Ad Apollodori Bibliothecam observationes auctore Chr.G. Heyne.
Göttingen, typis Henrici Dieterich, 1803. 8vo. 2 volumes in 1: LVI,468;400,(112 indices) p. Modern cloth. 21 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,199/200; Dibdin 1,272/72: 'universally admired'; Moss 1,64; Brunet 1,345: 'Édition la plus estimée') (Condition: Paper yellowing. Some slight foxing) (Note: Heyne thoroughly revised and corrected his first edition and commentary, which was published in 1782-1783. 'Heyne for the first time managed to purge the text from the many errors that had been brought in by Aegius. (.) But his most important contribution is certainly his copious and still useful exegetical commentary'. (M. Huys, '125 years of scholarship of Apollodorus the Mythographer', in 'L'Antiquité Classique', 66 (1997), 1997, p. 321) The 'Library', a late antique work on Greek mythology, is nowadays attributed to one 'Pseudo-Apollodorus'. In his dissertation of 1873 the German classical scholar Carl Robert proved that this work cannot be identified or derived from any work of the Alexandrian scholar Apollodorus Atheniensis, who was born ca. 180 B.C. in Athens. Already the Dutch 17th century classical scholar Isaac Vossius had uttered the possibility of its inauthenticity. Carl Robert showed that the character of the 'Library' was totally alien from the spirit of Alexandrian scholarship. He describes the work as destined for use in school, and dates it to the first half of the 2nd century A.D. By critics of Robert it was objected that the schortcomings of the work were characteristic of the activity of an epitomator. Eduard Schwarz stated in an article in the RE (1894) that it was not a schoolbook, but that it was a manual aiming at the general instruction of an educated public. The Dutch scholar Marchinus van der Valk attemped in an article in REG 7 (1958), p. 100-168, a detailed investigation into the sources of the 'Library'. 'Among these sources he mainly focusses on the Argonautika of Apollonios of Rhodos, which Apollodorus would have consulted directly, Pherekydes (.) and Hellanikos.' According to Van der Valk the explicit references to many sources point to a direct dependency, and their uniform character is an indication of the deliberate concept of one author rather than of a second-rate production depending exclusively on mythological manuals. Further, Van der Valk derives from the artificial decency forced upon several legendary treatments, that the work was primarily destined for use at school, and dates it to the first century A.D. on the basis of the idiom'. § The worth of this unpretending manual lies in the preservation of older material, and it remains a valuable source for our knowledge on previous mythography and Hellenistic scholarship, and archaic poetry. Its usefulness for didactic purposes was already recognized in antiquity, and explains its popularity ever since the 'editio princeps' of 1555, published by the humanist Benedetto Egio of Spoleto, or in Latin Benedictus Aegius Spoletinus, who also added a Latin translation and some notes. All manuscripts of the 'Library' go back to one incomplete manuscript, which was copied for Cardinal Bessarion in the 15th century. Aegius boasts that he restored the mutilated text in its original splendor. But, 'alas by his hypercritical activity many 'Verschlimbesserungen' have intruded into the text'. (Source: M. Huys, '125 years of scholarship of Apollodorus the Mythographer', in 'L'Antiquité Classique', 66 (1997), 1997, p. 319-351)
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Book number: 115758
€  110.00 [Appr.: US$ 124.6 | £UK 99.75 | JP¥ 14137]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Altertum Altertumswissenschaft Antike Antiquity Bibliotheca Greek literature Griechische Literatur Heyne Mythologie classical philology mythology

 
APOLLODORUS ATHENIENSIS.
APOLLODÔROU TOU ATHÊNAIOU BIBLIOTHÊKÊS, ê peri theôn BIBLIA G'. Apollodori Atheniensis Bibliotheces, sive de Diis libri tres. Tanaquillus Faber recensuit & notulas addidit.
Saumur (Salmurii), Apud Ioannem Lenerium, 1661. 4to. (IV),(II),289,(1 blank) p. Vellum 17 cm (Ref: Hoffmann 1,199; Dibdin 1,272: 'an accurate edition'; Moss 1,63; Brunet 1,344/45; Ebert 802; Graesse 1,162) (Details: 2 thongs laced throught the joints. Short title on the back. Title in red and black. Woodcut printer's mark of Jean Lesnier on the title, a flying eagle (?) with a banner, motto 'movendo'. A remarkable feature of this book is the preservation of a cancelled leaf. The book contains immediately after the title two short dedications, which are the same except for the heading. Tanaquillus Faber dedicates the book first to 'N. de Roche-Choüart illustri comiti Lemovicensi', and on the following leaf to 'Illustri Comiti Lemovicensi de Roche-Choüart'. The only difference is the word order and the absence/presence of the 'N', the first letter of the count's christian name. The paper quality of the second dedication is visibly better than the rest of the book, so we must conclude that the second dedication was added, and that the first should have been cancelled. Perhaps it was thought to be improper to address the count of the Limousin with his christian name) (Condition: Vellum age-tanned. Back very slightly damaged. Paper yellowing) (Note: 'Is this manual a schoolbook, a popularizing work transmitting mythological knowledge, or a work of erudition?' The 'Library', a late antique work on Greek mythology, is nowadays attributed to one 'Pseudo-Apollodorus'. In his dissertation of 1873 the German classical scholar Carl Robert proved that this work cannot be identified or derived from any work of the Alexandrian scholar Apollodorus Atheniensis, who was born ca. 180 B.C. in Athens. Already the Dutch 17th century classical scholar Isaac Vossius had uttered the possibility of its inauthenticity. Carl Robert showed that the character of the 'Library' was totally alien from the spirit of Alexandrian scholarship. He describes the work as destined for the use in school, and dates it to the first half of the 2nd century A.D. By critics of Robert it was objected that the schortcomings of the work were characteristic of the activity of an epitomator. Eduard Schwarz stated in an article in the RE (1894) that it was not a schoolbook, but that it was a manual aiming at the general instruction of an educated public. The Dutch scholar Marchinus van der Valk attemped in an article in REG 7 (1958), p. 100-168, a detailed investigation into the sources of the 'Library'. 'Among these sources he mainly focusses on the Argonautika of Apollonios of Rhodos, which Apollodorus would have consulted directly, Pherekydes (.) and Hellanikos (.). According to Van der Valk the explicit references to many sources point to a direct dependency, and their uniform character is an indication of the deliberate concept of one author rather than of a second-rate production depending exclusively on mythological manuals. Further, Van der Valk derives from the artificial decency forced upon several legendary treatments that the work was primarily destined for use at school, and dates it to the first century A.D. on the basis of the idiom'. (Source: M. Huys, '125 years of scholarship of Apollodorus the Mythographer', in 'L'Antiquité Classique', 66 (1997), 1997, p. 319-351) The worth of this unpretending manual lies in the preservation of older material, and it remains a valuable source for our knowledge of previous mythography and Hellenistic scholarship, and archaic poetry. Its usefulness for didactic purposes was already recognized in antiquity, and explains its popularity ever since the 'editio princeps' of 1555, published by the humanist Benedetto Egio of Spoleto, or in Latin Benedictus Aegius Spoletinus, who also added a Latin translation and some notes. All manuscripts of the 'Library' go back to one incomplete manuscript, which was copied for Cardinal Bessarion in the 15th century. Aegius boasts that he restored the mutilated text in its original splendor. But, 'alas by his hypercritical activity many 'Verschlimbesserungen' have intruded into the text'. (Idem, p. 320) In 1599 Hieronymus Commelinus published the next edition. The third, this edition, was published by the French scholar Tanneguy Le Fèbvre, or in Latin Tanaquillus Faber, 1615-1672, 'professeur de grec de l'Académie protestante de Saumur'. He presented a revised Greek text of his own, obviously without consulting manuscripts. His method was simply to read and reread the text of Aegius as careful as he could. His notes, he says, will show how and where he departed from Aegius' text. 'Graecum autem contextum legimus, relegimus, quanta maxima cura & diligentia fieri potuit, cuius rei fidem, spero, facient notulae nostrae'. Faber printed on the pages facing the Greek text the Latin translation of Aegius, 'locis infinitis' corrected. (Bibliothêkê, 1661, p. 260) Faber suggested that the 'Library' was an 'Epitome' of a larger work of Apollonius Atheniensis, the 'Peri Theôn'. § Faber was a diligent editor of Greek and Latin texts, but he is famous because of his daughter Anne Le Fèvre, 1647-1720, who later married the scholar André Dacier. It was her second marriage. This Apollodorus edition of 1661 was printed and published by the French publisher Jean de Lesnier, 1639-1675, printer for the protestant academy of Saumur. In 1664 De Lesnier married Anne Le Fèvre, the daughter of the editor of this book Tanneguy Le Fèvre. After the publisher's early death in 1675, Anne, widowed at the age of 28, married in 1683 André Dacier, pupil of her father, and became a respected classical philologist herself under the name of 'Madame Dacier'. So in 1661, when Anne was 14 years old, De Lesnier printed this work of his future father in law. He married her when she was 17) (Collation: pi2, (pi2 should have been cancelled for the next leaf chi1), chi1; A-Z4. Aa-Nn4, (Oo)1 (verso blank)) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 152310
€  560.00 [Appr.: US$ 634.33 | £UK 507 | JP¥ 71971]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Apollodorus Bibliotheca Bibliotheke French imprints Greek literature Greek mythology Greek text Griechische Literatur Latin translation Tanaquillus Faber antike altertum antiquity griechische Mythologie

 
MOERIS ATTICISTES.
MOIRIDOS ATTIKISTOU LEXEIS ATTIKÔN kai HELLÊNÔN kata stoicheion. Moeridis Atticistae lexicon atticum, cum Jo. Hudsoni, Steph. Bergleri, Claud. Sallierii, aliorumque notis. Secundum ordinem MSStorum restituit, emendavit, animadversionibusque illustravit, Joannes Piersonus. Accedit AILIOU HÊRÔDIANOU PHILETAIROS. Aelii Herodiani Philetaerus, e Ms nunc primum editus, item ejusdem Fragmentum e MSS. emendatius atque auctius.
Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Apud Petrum van der Eyk et Cornelium de Pecker, 1759. 8vo. (IV),LXVI,(2),480,44 p. H.calf. 22 cm (Ref: STCN ppn 240337786; Brunet 3,1788: 'Bonne édition, dans laquelle le texte a été rétabli d'après des manuscrits'; Graesse 4,558: 'la meilleure édition'; Ebert 14181: 'The best edition. A new recension from MSS. and restored to its original order'; Neue Pauly 8, col. 343/4: still the first listed edition) (Details: Back gilt and with 5 raised bands. Shield in the second compartment. Margins uncut) (Condition: Binding worn. Back rubbed. Boards chafed. Corners bumped. Foot of the spine slightly damaged) (Note: This edition is according to Klaus Alpers in the Neue Pauly, (2001) s.v. 'Lexikographie' a very important contribution to Greek lexicography. (NP 15,130). Johannes Pierson was a much promising Dutch philologist, born in 1731, who died young in 1759 in Leeuwarden, where he was rector of the Schola Latina from 1755. At the university of Franeker, where the Renaissance of Dutch Greek studies had begun, he was a pupil of J.C. Valckenaer and Is. Schrader. In 1751 he matriculated at the University of Leyden to hear T. Hemsterhuis. Hemsterhuis advised his students to use especially the lexica of the ancients. The ancient lexicographers could be of great use for the amending of texts of classical authors, and they were of great help to gain a profound knowledge of the Greek language and its vocabulary. Valckenaer chose Ammonius, Pierson Moeris Atticistes. This was a great age for ancient lexicographers. In 1754 D. Ruhnkenius published his edition of the Platonic dictionary of Timaeus Sophista. (Sandys 2,461; NNBW 3, 976/77; Gerretzen, Schola Hemsterhusiana, 1940, p. 46 & 100). § Moeris (Moiris) was a Greek grammarian and lexicographer, from ca. 200 AD. He compiled a lexicon for the use of correct Attic under the title 'Lexeis Attikôn kai Hellênôn kata stoicheion'. Examples of correct Greek are taken from Plato, Thucydides, Xenophon, the Attic orators and Aristophanes. (NP 8,343/4). The last 50 p. of Pierson's edition are filled with the 'Editio Princeps' of the Philetaerus of Herodian. Nowadays this ancient lexicon is only ascribed to 'Aelius Herodianus et Pseudo-Herodianus', one of the most important Greek grammarians, who lived in the 2nd cent. A.D. (cf. NP 5,465/6) (Collation: *-4*8, 5*4, A-2I8 2K6)(2 leaves of gathering Kk are bound in wrong order)) (Photographs on request)
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Book number: 130374
€  180.00 [Appr.: US$ 203.89 | £UK 163 | JP¥ 23134]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Dutch imprints Greek linguistics Greek literature Greek text Griechische Literatur Lexica Lexikographie Lexikon antike altertum antiquity griechische Sprachwissenschaft lexicography lexicon

 
HISTORIA AUGUSTA.
Historiae Augustae Scriptores VI. Aelius Spartianus, Vulc. Gallicanus, Julius Capitolinus, Trebell. Pollio, Aelius Lampridius, Flavius Vopiscus. Cum notis selectis Isaaci Casauboni, Cl. Salmasii & Jani Gruteri. Cum indice locupletissimo rerum ac verborum. Accurante Cornelio Schrevelio.
Leiden (Lugduni Batavorum), Ex officina Francisci Hackii, 1661. 8vo. (VI),997,(35 index) p., engraved title. Recently repaired calf. 19 cm (Ref: STCN ppn 840035284; Schweiger 2,385; Fabricius/Ernesti, 3,102; Graesse 3,304; Ebert 9831) (Details: Boards with blind double fillet borders; the boards have a blind triple fillet rectangle in the center, and on its corners 4 blind stamped 'fleur de lis'. Frontispiece, depicting the seated goddess Roma; she looks in despair at the capture and humiliation of the Roman emperor Valerianus I (the father of Gallienus) by the Sassanid king Shapur after the battle of Edessa (Syria) in 260 A.D. Shapur, who is on horseback, and holds his foot on the neck of Valerianus, using him as a human footstool when mounting; his horse tramples the Roman eagle; this shocking defeat is narrated by 'Trebellius Pollio' in the short biography of 'Valerianus Pater et Filius') (Condition: The spine is rebacked with cloth, the original backstrip has been preserved and pasted on the back. 2 bookplates and some shelf numbers on the front pastedown. 2 ownership entries on the front flyleaf. Outer margin of the title thumbed, and showing 2 minute tears. Paper in the gutter of the first and last 40 p. waterstained, continuing and gradually disappearing halfway) (Note: This is a 'Variorum' edition of the 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores VI', nowadays referred to as 'Historia Augusta'. A 'Variorum' edition generally offers a 'textus receptus' which is widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of various specialists, taken, or excerpted from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. Their involvement in publishing a new edition was limited to the necessary, but ungrateful task of the beast of burden. Such a plodder was the Dutch editor Cornelius Schrevelius, who taught classics at the 'Schola Latina' at Leiden, where he had been raised himself. In 1642 he succeeded his father, Theodorus Schrevelius, as the rector (Moderator) of the school. He raised at least 11 kids, and fell in 1664 victim to the then raging plague. (A.M. Coebergh van den Braak, Meer dan zes eeuwen Leids Gymnasium, Leiden, 1988, p. 47/55; includes also his portrait). § This collection of 30 biographies of Roman emperors, Caesars and usurpers was published for the first time in 1475. It formed part of a bigger collection of historical texts. The surviving 30 biographies were probably written between 293 and 330 A.D. They cover the period from Hadrian to Carinus (roughly 117-284/85). The collection is one of the most debated and controversial sources for the history of the Roman empire. The historic value of the 30 biographies is diverse, some seem to be trustworthy and offer useful information, others seem to be fiction, full of wondrous tales, anecdotes and short stories. Some tend to having been written in the tradition of the ancient novel. The obvious falsification of sources and documents rendered the entire collection suspect. The French classical scholar Isaac Casaubon, or Isaacus Casaubonus, 1559 - 1619, was the first to publish the biographies written by the otherwise unknown authors Aelianus Spartianus, Iulius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio & Flavius Vopiscus, separately in 1603, under the title 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex'. The first part contained the text, the second the exhaustive commentary of Casaubon. Caution about the use of the 'Historia Augusta' was already made by Casaubon. 'He revealed some of their inconsistencies and improbable statements. He used considerations of style and content to argue that the works ascribed in the manuscripts to Aelius Spartianus, Aelius Lampridius and Julius Capitolinus could more plausibly be ascribed to a single author'. (A. Grafton, 'Defenders of the text', Cambr. Mass. 1991, p. 148). 1611 saw a new edition of the text, corrected by the classical scholar Janus Gruter, 1560-1627. He lectured in Heidelberg, where he was appointed librarian in 1602. For this new edition he used a manuscript from his employer's library, the famous 'Bibliotheca Palatina'. He chose well, for recent research revealed that this 'Codex Palatinus' was the parent manuscript of a number of other manuscripts. This 'Codex Palatinus' was also consulted by the French scholar Claude de Saumaise, or Claudius Salmasius, 1588 - 1653. His edition of 1620 follows the groundbreaking edition of Casaubon. He found that the manuscript from the Royal Library in Paris, on which Casaubon had relied, was inferior to the 'Codex Palatinus'. 'Salmasius Anmerkungen sind höchst schätzbar und erläutern die Sprache, besonders aber die Sachen. Vorzüglichste Ausgabe dieser Schriftsteller'. (Schweiger)) (Provenance: On the front pastedown pasted an armorial bookplate of 'Lavington'. It depicts a dolphin between 2 wings. This bookplate must be connected with 'East Lavington House', residence of the Wilberforce family in West-Sussex. In this mansion was born in 1888 Octavia Wilberforce. She wanted a career in medicine, but her parents were opposed to that idea. Her father became so angry at her decision that he cut her out of his will. She was qualified as a doctor in 1920. She campaigned for women's rights, and in 1927 se set up a convalescent home at Backsettown, for overworked professional women. Her biography was written by Pat Jalland. (www).spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Wwilberforce.htm) § Below this bookplate the label 'From the Wilberforce library, Backsettown'. § On the front flyleaf in ink 'Jo. Conant, e Coll. Pemb. Oxon. 1723'. This is the Reverend John Conant, (Pembroke Hall, Oxford, MA 1730) vicar of Elmsted in Kent from 1736 till his death in 1779. He was born in 1706. (www).thepeerage.com/p24720.htm) § Below the name of the Reverend in ballpoint the name 'Lennart Hakanson', 1939-1987, professor of Latin at the university of Uppsala) (Collation: *4, A-3S8 3T4) (Photographs on request) (Heavy book, may require extra shipping costs)
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Book number: 130194
€  225.00 [Appr.: US$ 254.86 | £UK 203.75 | JP¥ 28917]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Altertum Altertumswissenschaft Antike Antiquity Casaubon Casaubonus Claude Saumaise Claudius Salmasius Geschichte Historia Augusta Jan Gruter Janus Gruter Latin literature Roman history römische Literatur Schrevelius Scriptores A

 
HISTORIA AUGUSTA.
Historiae Augustae Scriptores VI. Aelius Spartianus, Vulc. Gallicanus, Julius Capitolinus, Trebell. Pollio, Aelius Lampridius, Flavius Vopiscus. Cum integris notis Isaaci Casauboni, Cl. Salmasii & Jani Gruteri. Cum indicibus locupletissimis rerum ac verborum.
Leiden (Lugd. Batavorum), Ex Officina Hackiana, 1671. 8vo. 2 volumes: (XVI),1049,(79 index); 866,(74 index) p. Overlapping vellum 20.5 cm (Ref: STCN ppn 840035187; Schweiger 2,385; Brunet 3,226; Fabricius/Ernesti, 'Bibliotheca Latina' 3,102: 'in qua elegante editione Iani Gruteri, Casauboni et Salmasii notae bono consilio iunctae sunt'; Graesse 3,304; Ebert 9831: 'One of the better editions') (Details: Six thongs laced through the joints. Volume 1 has a frontispiece, engraved by G. Wingendorp, depicting scenes of bloodshed and murder from the HA. Woodcut printer's mark on the first title, a flying eagle, motto: 'movendo'. Volume 2 has an engraved title in the same style as the frontispiece) (Condition: Vellum soiled. Some light foxing) (Note: This collection of biographies of Roman emperors, Caesars and usurpers was published for the first time in 1475. It formed part of a bigger collection of historical texts. The French classical scholar Isaac Casaubon, in Latin Isaacus Casaubonus, was the first to publish the biographies written by the otherwise unknown authors Aelianus Spartianus, Iulius Capitolinus, Aelius Lampridius, Vulcatius Gallicanus, Trebellius Pollio & Flavius Vopiscus, separately in 1603, under the title 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex'. The first part contained the text, the second the exhaustive commentary of Casaubon. The 30 surviving biographies of the 'Historiae Augustae Scriptores Sex' were probably written between 293 and 330 A.D. They cover the period from Hadrian to Carinus, roughly 117-284/85. The collection is one of the most debated and controversial sources for the history of the Roman empire. The historic value of the 30 biographies is diverse, some seem to be trustworthy and offer useful information, others seem to be fiction, full of wondrous tales, anecdotes and short stories. Some tend to having been written in the tradition of the ancient novel. The obvious falsification of sources and documents rendered the entire collection suspect. Such caution and some of these observations and were already made by Casaubon. 'He revealed some of their inconsistencies and improbable statements. He used considerations of style and content to argue that the works ascribed in the manuscripts to Aelius Spartianus, Aelius Lampridius and Julius Capitolinus could more plausibly be ascribed to a single author'. (A. Grafton, 'Defenders of the text', Cambr. Mass. 1991, p. 148) 1611 saw a new edition of the text, corrected by the classical scholar Janus Gruter, 1560-1627. He lectured in Heidelberg, where he was appointed librarian in 1602. For this new edition he used a new manuscript from the famous 'Bibliotheca Palatina'. He chose well, for recent research revealed that this 'Codex Palatinus' was the parent manuscript of a number of other manuscripts. This 'Codex Palatinus' was also consulted by the French scholar Claude de Saumaise, in Latin Claudius Salmasius, 1588 - 1653. His edition of 1620 follows the groundbreaking edition of Casaubon. Salmasius found that the manuscript from the Royal Library in Paris, on which Casaubon had relied, was inferior to the 'Codex Palatinus'. 'Salmasius Anmerkungen sind höchst schätzbar und erläutern die Sprache, besonders aber die Sachen. Vorzüglichste Ausgabe dieser Schriftsteller'. (Schweiger) This edition of 1671 is a 'Variorum' edition. It offers the 'textus receptus' which was widely accepted, accompanied with the commentary and the annotations of specialists, taken from earlier useful, normative or renewing editions. Editions like these, 'cum notis Variorum', were useful, but never broke new ground. The production of this kind of editions was the specialty of Dutch scholars of the 17th and 18th century. The compilers seldom were great scholars, but often hard working schoolmasters. The compiler of this 1671 edition is anonymous, probably the publisher himself. In the short 'praefatio' he tells that his involvement was limited to simply reissueing the Latin text of Salmasius, followed by the complete erudite notes of Casaubon, Salmasius and Gruter, 'rei literariae triumviros'. It is a pity that the prefaces of the three editions have been omitted. Nowadays it is believed by most scholars that the collected biographies had only one author, writing for the Roman senatorial aristocracy. 'Generell wird die Geschichte des 2. und 3. Jahrhundert aus dem Blickwinkel der nichtchristlich stadtrömischen Senatsaristokratie betrachtet und das Kaisertum nach dem Verhalten zu diesem Stand bewertet'. (NP 5,638) (Provenance: on the front pastedown of both volumes has been pasted the engraved armorial bookplate of: 'The Right Honorable Sir John Trollope, Bart, M.P.'. This is probably Sir John Trollope, 1800-1874, 7th Baronet of Casewick in the county of Lincoln, and created Baron Kasteven in 1868. He was a conservative politician, and M.P. for Lincolnshire South. (See Wikipedia 'John Trollope, 1st Baron Kesteven', and 'Trollope Baronets') (Collation: *8, A-4A8 4B4; A-3N8)(minus the 2 last blank leaves 3N7 & 3N8)) (Photographs on request) (Heavy book, may require extra shipping costs)
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Book number: 130087
€  300.00 [Appr.: US$ 339.82 | £UK 271.75 | JP¥ 38556]
Keywords: (Oude Druk) (Rare Books) Casaubon Casaubonus Claude Saumaise Claudius Salmasius Geschichte Historia Augusta Jan Gruter Janus Gruter Latin literature Roman history Scriptores Augustae Historiae antike altertum antiquity classical philology römische Geschi

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