David Brass Rare Books, Inc.: American Literature
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 BERENDT, JOHN, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
BERENDT, JOHN
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
New York: Random House, 1994. The Longest Standing Best Seller on the New York Times List BERENDT, John. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. A Savannah Story. New York: Random House, [1994]. First edition. Octavo (9 3/16 x 5 9/16 inches; 233 x 137 mm.). [viii], 388, [iv], pp. Publisher's quarter black cloth over black paper boards, front cover with "JB" stamped n gilt, spine lettered in gilt. A mint copy in the original pictorial dust jacket. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is a non-fiction work by John Berendt. Published in 1994, the book was Berendt's first, and became a The New York Times bestseller for 216 weeks following its debut and still, to this day, the longest-standing best-seller of the Times. The book was subsequently made into a 1997 movie, directed by Clint Eastwood and was loosely on Berendt's story of the real-life events that took place in Savannah, Georgia in the 1980s. The film features Kevin Spacey as Jim Williams, a man on trial for murder, and John Cusack as John Kelso, a writer covering the case. Several changes were made in adapting the film from the novel. Many of the more colorful characters were eliminated or made into composite characters. The writer, played by Cusack, was based upon Berendt, but was given a love interest not featured in the book, played by Eastwood's daughter Alison Eastwood. The multiple Williams trials were combined into one on-screen trial. Jim Williams' real life attorney Sonny Seiler appears in the movie in the role of Judge White, the presiding judge of the trial. John Berendt (born December 5, 1939) is an American author, known for writing the best-selling non-fiction book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, which was a finalist for the 1995 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction. .
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Book number: 03389
USD 250.00 [Appr.: EURO 213.25 | £UK 195 | JP¥ 26370]
Keywords: Modern Firsts Books into Film

 BURNETT, FRANCES HODGSON, Little Lord Fauntleroy
BURNETT, FRANCES HODGSON
Little Lord Fauntleroy
New-York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1886. First Edition, First Isue of Little Lord Fauntleroy With a Signed Quotation from the Book BURNETT, Frances Hodgson. Little Lord Fauntleroy. New-York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1886. First edition, first issue, with the imprint of the De Vinne Press on the verso of the final leaf of text. With a signed ink quotation from the book loosely inserted ""He was always/lovable because/he was simple and/loving"/Frances Hodgson Burnett". (p. 205, line 16). Small quarto (8 1/4 x 6 1/2 inches; 209 x 165 mm.). xi, [xii], 209, [1], [14, ads] pp. With twenty-six illustrations from drawings by Reginald B. Birch, many of them full-page. Publisher's green cloth, front cover and spine pictorially stamped in red, black and gilt, brown coated endpapers. Minimal rubbing to extremities, inner hinges sound. An excellent copy with an original quotation from the book. Chemised in a quarter dark blue morocco slipcase (chemise joints neatly strengthened). Little Lord Fauntleroy is a sentimental novel by the English-American writer Frances Hodgson Burnett, her first children's novel. It was published as a serial in St. Nicholas Magazine from November 1885 to October 1886, then as a book by Scribner's (the publisher of St. Nicholas) in 1886. The novel's protagonist, Cedric, and his mother, Dearest, live in America until Cedric learns that he is to inherit the title and estate of his paternal grandfather. The mother and son then move to England, where Cedric, as Lord Fauntleroy, charms his embittered grandfather, the Earl of Dorincourt, and everyone else he meets with his open, egalitarian ways. In the illustrations for the novel and in the popular stage play that followed, Cedric's hair was worn in shoulder-length curls. He is clad in velvet knee pants and a white lace collar (which would later be referred to as a Lord Fauntleroy collar). Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett (1849-1924) was a British-born American novelist and playwright who was born in Cheetham, Manchester, England. She is best known for the three children's novels Little Lord Fauntleroy (1886), A Little Princess (1905), and The Secret Garden (1911). After her father died in 1852, the family fell on straitened circumstances and in 1865 they emigrated to the United States, settling in New Market, Tennessee. There, Frances began writing to help earn money for the family, publishing stories in magazines from the age of 19. In 1870, her mother died, and in 1872 she married Swan Burnett, who became a medical doctor. The Burnetts lived for two years in Paris, where their two sons were born, before returning to the United States to live in Washington, D.C. Burnett then began to write novels, the first of which (That Lass o' Lowrie's), was published to good reviews. Little Lord Fauntleroy was published in 1886 and made her a popular writer of children's fiction, although her romantic adult novels written in the 1890s were also popular. She wrote and helped to produce stage versions of Little Lord Fauntleroy and A Little Princess. Beginning in the 1880s, Burnett began to travel to England frequently and in the 1890s bought a home there, where she wrote The Secret Garden. Her oldest son, Lionel, died of tuberculosis in 1890, which caused a relapse of the depression she had struggled with for much of her life. She divorced Swan Burnett in 1898, married Stephen Townsend in 1900, and divorced him in 1902. A few years later she settled in Nassau County, New York, where she died in 1924 and is buried in Roslyn Cemetery. In 1936 a memorial sculpture by Bessie Potter Vonnoh was erected in her honor in Central Park's Conservatory Garden. The statue depicts her two famous Secret Garden characters, Mary and Dickon. BAL 2064. .
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Book number: 04735
USD 1950.00 [Appr.: EURO 1662.5 | £UK 1520 | JP¥ 205684]
Keywords: Books into Film Nineteenth-Century Literature

 COOPER, JAMES FENIMORE, Chainbearer, the; or the Littlepage Manuscripts
COOPER, JAMES FENIMORE
Chainbearer, the; or the Littlepage Manuscripts
New-York: Burgess, Stringer and Company, 1845. The Growing Corruption of Civilization" James Fenimore Cooper's The Chainbearer in the Original Printed Wrappers A Remarkable Survival COOPER, James Fenimore. The Chainbearer; or The Littlepage Manuscripts. Edited by the Author of "Satanstoe," "Spy," "Pathfinder," "Two Admirals, " etc. In Two Volumes. New-York: Burgess, Stringer and Company, 1845. First American Edition. Two octavo volumes (7 11/16 x 4 9/16 inches; 196 x 117 mm.). [i]-iii, iv-vi, 7-212; [1-3], 4-228 pp. Publisher's pale buff paper printed wrappers. The wrappers have been noted by BAL in three different states. No sequence has been determined and the order presented is arbitrary. The wrappers may have been printed simultaneously. In the present copy the wrappers on volume I are in State 'B' with inner front "Mrs. Ellis's Housekeeping"; inner back "History of All Christian Sects.." and back wrapper with "The Great Book". The wrappers on volume II are in State 'A' with inner front "New and Beautiful Edition"; inner back "The Great Book" and back wrapper with "Cheap Books". Some light scattered foxing and or staining. Clean tear to lower margin of pp. iii/iv of preface in volume one. Lower wrapper of volume one with small piece (1 5/8 x 9/16 inches maximum) torn away from blank margin not touching any of the print on recto or verso, a couple of stains on the front and rear wrappers. A remarkable survival, generally bright and fresh, with no restoration whatsoever. Individually chemised and housed in a quarter red morocco over red cloth board slip-case. The first London edition, which preceded the American edition by about one month, was published in three volumes on November 22nd, 1845. The Chainbearer; or The Littlepage Manuscripts is the second book in a trilogy starting with Satanstoe (1845) and ending with The Redskins (1846). The novel focuses mainly on issues of land ownership and the displacement of American Indians as the United States moves Westward. Critical to the trilogy of these novels, is the sense of expansion through the measuring and acquisition of land by civilization. The title The Chainbearer represents "the man who carries the chains in measuring the land, the man who helps civilization to grow from the wilderness, but who at the same time continues the chain of evil, increases the potentiality for corruption." The central position of the "Chainbearer" allows Cooper to deal with the cultural lack of understanding Native Americans had of European concepts of land ownership. This in turn allows Cooper to critique ownership in general. Also, Cooper, like in many of his novels, focuses on the growing corruption of individuals in "civilization" as it expands. This Cooper attributes "an inherent principle in the corrupt nature of man to misuse all his privileges. If history proves anything, it proves this." Two characters, in particular, represent this growing corruption of civilization, Andries Mordaunt, the chainbearer, and Aaron, known as "Thousandacres". The men represent different types of the civilization, Mordaunt as the usurper of old civilization and Thousandacres representing an older society which the new "civilization" means to usurp. Eventually this new civilization decides to embrace force in order to lay full claim on the land. This displacement of Native Americans by the ever expansionist Americans repeatedly becomes an issue for Cooper throughout the trilogy of novels. In so doing, Cooper presents a very strong critique of Americans and America. (Wikipedia). .
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Book number: 03755
USD 7500.00 [Appr.: EURO 6394 | £UK 5845.75 | JP¥ 791092]
Keywords: Nineteenth-Century Literature

 CRANE, HART; LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB; BENSON, RICHARD, PHOTOGRAPHER; COWLEY, MALCOLM, INTRODUCTION, Bridge, the
CRANE, HART; LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB; BENSON, RICHARD, PHOTOGRAPHER; COWLEY, MALCOLM, INTRODUCTION
Bridge, the
New York: Printed for the Members of The Limited Editions Club, 1981. A Monument of American Poetry" CRANE, Hart. The Bridge. A Poem.. With an Introduction by Malcolm Cowley and Photographs by Richard Benson. New York: Printed for the Members of The Limited Editions Club, 1981. Limited to 2,000 copies signed by Richard Benson, this being no. 521. Large quarto (11 15/16 x 9 inches; 304 x 228 mm.). 96 pp. Illustrated with five photographic plates (including one double-page) by Richard Benson. Publisher's silver-gray Dutch natural-finish cloth, front cover with title stamped in blind, spine lettered in blue, decorative end-papers. A fine copy in the publisher's matching slip-case. Harold Hart Crane (1899-1932) was an American poet. Finding both inspiration and provocation in the poetry of T. S. Eliot, Crane wrote modernist poetry that was difficult, highly stylized, and ambitious in its scope. In his most ambitious work, The Bridge, Crane sought to write an epic poem, in the vein of The Waste Land, that expressed a more optimistic view of modern, urban culture than the one that he found in Eliot's work. In the years following his suicide at the age of thirty-two, Crane has been hailed by playwrights, poets, and literary critics alike (including Robert Lowell, Derek Walcott, Tennessee Williams, and Harold Bloom), as being one of the most influential poets of his generation. Richard Benson (born 1943) is a photographer, printer and educator who utilizes photographic processing techniques of the past and present. Benson has a broad range of interests in the photographic print-silver, platinum, palladium, and ink. Working in these different mediums, sometimes learning forgotten crafts and sometimes creating new ones, he has become convinced that ink and the modern photo offset press possess a potential for photographic rendition beyond anything else previously known. In recent years he has been working on the relationship between the computer and traditional photographic imagery, and has been applying the lessons from this in the production of long run offset books of work by different photographers, in both black and white and color. Limited Editions Club Bibliography, 520. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 03680
USD 200.00 [Appr.: EURO 170.75 | £UK 156 | JP¥ 21096]
Keywords: LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB BENSON, Richard, photographer COWLEY, Malcolm, introduction Illustrated Books Poetry Signed Limited Edition Limited Editions

 [DICTIONARY]; WEBSTER, Webster's Biographical Dictionary
[DICTIONARY]; WEBSTER
Webster's Biographical Dictionary
Springfield: G. & C. Merriam Co. 1943. The First Single Volume Universal Biographical Dictionary [DICTIONARY]. WEBSTER. Webster's Biographical Dictionary. First Edition. A Merriam-Webster. A Dictionary of Names of Noteworthy Persons with Pronunciations and Concise Biographies. Springfield: G.&C. Webster, 1943. First edition. Quarto (9 1/2 x 6 5/8 in; 239 x 167 mm). xxxvi, 1697, [1, adv.] pp. Contemporary binding by Maurin in half prussian blue crushed morocco over blue cloth. Spine richly gilt decorated in compartments. A fine copy. The publication of Webster's Biographical Dictionary in 1943 was prompted by the decision of editor Philip Babcock Gove to delete all the non-lexicological information within Webster's Unabridged and create separate reference books from the expunged material. Webster's Geographical Dictionary followed in 1949. Both have become standard reference works and testaments to Gove's wisdom that the public needed single compact volumes with this material. Curiously, in this the first edition with upwards of 40,000 names, living notables were included within its pages. That would not change until the dictionary's revision in 1983. .
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Book number: 01265
USD 250.00 [Appr.: EURO 213.25 | £UK 195 | JP¥ 26370]
Keywords: WEBSTER Biography Dictionaries Literature

 FAULKNER, WILLIAM, Reivers, the
FAULKNER, WILLIAM
Reivers, the
New York: Random House, 1962. FAULKNER, William. The Reivers. A Reminiscence. New York: Random House, 1962. First edition, first printing. Octavo (7 15/16 x 5 1/8 in; 203 x 130 mm). 305, [1] pp. Publisher's original red cloth, gilt lettered. Dust jacket. A tight, bright, and fine copy in near fine dust jacket. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 02036
USD 300.00 [Appr.: EURO 256 | £UK 234 | JP¥ 31644]
Keywords: Modern Firsts

 HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL, Grandfather's Chair
HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL
Grandfather's Chair
Boston: E.P. Peabody, 1841. True Stories from New England History, 1620-1808 HAWTHORNE, Nathaniel. Grandfather's Chair: A History for Youth. Boston: E.P. Peabody. New York:-Wiley & Putnam, 1841. First edition. Sixteenmo (4 7/8 x 3 1/4 inches; 124 x 82 mm.). viii, [9] - 140. Publishers basket-weave plum cloth, cream endpapers. Without the gilt lettered black paper label on the front cover, otherwise a near fine copy of this scarce little book. Chemised in a quarter dark green morocco slip-case. BAL, 7590; Browne, p. 38. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 03108
USD 750.00 [Appr.: EURO 639.5 | £UK 584.75 | JP¥ 79109]
Keywords: Children's Books Nineteenth-Century Literature

 HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL, Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys, A.
HAWTHORNE, NATHANIEL
Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys, A.
Boston: Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1852. First Edition, First Printing of Nathaniel Hawthorne's Most Famous Children's Book Six Tales Adapted from Greek Myths HAWTHORNE, Nathaniel. A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys. With engravings by Baker from designs by Billings. Boston: Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1852. First edition, first printing, with the misprint "lifed" for lifted" on p. 21, line 3. Small octavo (6 5/8 x 4 3/8 inches; 169 x 111 mm.). [2, flyleaf], [i]-vi, [7]-256, [2, flyleaf] pp. Frontispiece and six inserted engraved plates after designs by Hammat Billings, all with original tissue-guards. Original gray-green, vertically ribbed cloth, covers stamped in blind, spine lettered in gilt, pale yellow wove endpapers. Some occasional and minimal light marginal soiling. Spine extremities expertly and almost invisibly strengthened (only visible under ultra-violet light), minimal rubbing to corners. Original endpapers and hinges untouched. A wonderful example of this superb collection of six children's tales adapted from Greek myths. First Edition, first printing, of this collection of six children's tales adapted from Greek myths. Although dated 1852 on the title-page, A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys was actually published in November 1851. 3,067 copies were printed, of which 100 were distributed for review and the other 2,967 earned Hawthorne a 15% royalty on the 75-cent price. A second printing was ordered almost immediately, in December 1851, also dated 1852 - but with the misprint on p. 21 corrected. Although Hawthorne had written a number of histories, biographies and morals for children prior to the publication of The Scarlet Letter in 1850, these early stories were primarily undertaken as hack-work and published in periodicals. Following the success of The Scarlet Letter, Hawthorne attempted to capitalize on his fame with two intended money-makers, A Wonder-Book and Tanglewood Tales, in 1853. Both were very popular and have since been celebrated for their retelling of myths for children. Includes six tales: "The Gorgon s Head," "The Paradise of Children," "The Three Golden Apples," "The Miraculous Pitcher," and "The Chimaera," as well as Hawthorne s version of the King Midas tale, "The Golden Touch." The popular success of A Wonder-Book led Hawthorne to publish another volume of children s stories in 1853, Tanglewood Tales. In his introduction to that book, he wrote "Children possess an unestimated sensitivity to whatever is deep or high, in imagination or feeling, so long as it is simple, likewise. It is only the artificial and the complex that bewilders them." Hawthorne wrote A Wonder-Book immediately after The House of the Seven Gables. That novel had sold 6,710 copies by August 1851, and A Wonder-Book sold 4,667 copies in just two months after its November 1851 publication. By comparison, his friend Herman Melville's novel Moby-Dick was released the same month, with the British edition selling under 300 copies in two years, and the American edition under 1,800 in the first year. BAL 7606; Clark A18.1.a; Grolier Hawthorne 25; Peter Parley to Penrod, p.6. .
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Book number: 04713
USD 2500.00 [Appr.: EURO 2131.5 | £UK 1948.75 | JP¥ 263697]
Keywords: Children's Books Classical Literature Fantasy Literature Nineteenth-Century Literature

 LONDON, JACK; LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB; MARTIN, FLETCHER, ILLUSTRATOR; GILLIGAN, EDMUND, INTRODUCTION, Sea-Wolf, the
LONDON, JACK; LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB; MARTIN, FLETCHER, ILLUSTRATOR; GILLIGAN, EDMUND, INTRODUCTION
Sea-Wolf, the
Hartford: Printed for the members of The Limited Editions Club by The Connecticut Printers, 1961. He was not Immoral, but merely Unmoral" (Jack London) LONDON, Jack. The Sea-Wolf. With Illustrations by Fletcher Martin and an Introduction by Edmund Gilligan. Hartford: Printed for the members of The Limited Editions Club by The Connecticut Printers, 1961. Limited to 1,500 copies signed by Fletcher Martin, this being no. 1434. Large octavo (11 x 7 3/4 inches; 279 x 197 mm.). 366 pp. Publisher's full Irish linen, front cover silkscreened in maroon with a design by Fletcher Martin, spine lettered in black. A fine copy in the publisher's maroon cloth slipcase with paper label on spine. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, (1876-1916) was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone. Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf, a psychological adventure novel. The book's protagonist, Humphrey van Weyden, is a literary critic who is a survivor of an ocean collision and who comes under the dominance of Wolf Larsen, the powerful and amoral sea captain who rescues him. Fletcher Martin (1904-1979), was an American painter, illustrator, muralist and educator. He is best known for his images of soldier life during World War II and his sometimes brutal images of boxing and other sports. Limited Editions Club Bibliography, 326. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 03681
USD 150.00 [Appr.: EURO 128 | £UK 117 | JP¥ 15822]
Keywords: LIMITED EDITIONS CLUB MARTIN, Fletcher, illustrator GILLIGAN, Edmund, introduction Illustrated Books Signed Limited Edition Limited Editions

 [ARION PRESS]; MAMET, DAVID; MCCURDY, MICHAEL (ARTIST), American Buffalo
[ARION PRESS]; MAMET, DAVID; MCCURDY, MICHAEL (ARTIST)
American Buffalo
San Francisco: Arion Press, 1992. Mamet's Masterpiece Signed by the Author and the Artist [ARION PRESS]. MAMET, David. McCurdy, Michael (artist). American Buffalo. A Play by David Mamet. With Wood Engravings by Michael McCurdy. San Francisco: Arion Press, 1992. Limited to 400 numbered copies for sale signed by the author and artist, this being copy number 268. Quarto (10 3/4 x 7 7/8 in; 272 x 200 mm).117, (3, blnk) pp. Teal silk with onlaid title label and inlaid buffalo nickel. As new. American Buffalo is the play that won David Mamet his initial fame. It won an Obie Award for best new play, 1976. New York Drama Critics Circle Award for best play of the 1977 season, and was also nominated for two Tony Awards: Best Direction of a Play and Best Scenic Design. It received four Drama Desk Award nominations, including Outstanding New Play (American). The 1983 revival was nominated for the Tony Award, Best Reproduction and the Drama Desk Award, Outstanding Actor in a Play (Al Pacino). Mamet won a Pulitzer Prize for Glengary Glenn Ross in 1986, and received the PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award for Grand Master of American Theater in 2010. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 01639
USD 375.00 [Appr.: EURO 319.75 | £UK 292.5 | JP¥ 39555]
Keywords: MAMET, David McCURDY, Michael (artist) Fine Printing Plays Signed Limited Edition

 [ARION PRESS]; [MOSER, BARRY, ILLUSTRATOR]; MELVILLE, HERMAN, Moby-Dick; or, the Whale
[ARION PRESS]; [MOSER, BARRY, ILLUSTRATOR]; MELVILLE, HERMAN
Moby-Dick; or, the Whale
San Francisco: The Arion Press, 1979. A Feat of Craftsmanship Unexcelled in Modern Printing" A 'Special Presentation Copy' with an Original Pencil Drawing of 'Moby-Dick' on the Title-Page Additionally Every Illustration Signed in Pencil by Barry Moser [ARION PRESS]. [MOSER, Barry, illustrator]. MELVILLE, Herman. Moby-Dick; or, The Whale. San Francisco: The Arion Press, 1979. Limited to 265 copies on Barcham Green handmade paper. This a presentation copy, signed by Barry Moser on Colophon "For Ray". Additionally there is a fine pencil drawing of 'Moby-Dick' on the title-page signed by Moser. Folio (15 x 10 inches; 381 x 254 mm). xv, [xvi blank], 576 [577] Epilogue, [1 blank,] [579] Colophon, [1 blank] pp. Typeset by Andrew Hoyem in 18 pt. Goudy Modern with Leviathan titling, designed especially for this book by Charles Bigelow and Kris Holmes. Printed in black and blue on handmade Barcham Green paper bearing a whale watermark. With 100 wood-engravings by Barry Moser. Edited from the edition published by Northwestern University and the Newberry Library by Harrison Hayford, Hershel Parker, and G. Thomas Tanselle. Special copy with every illustration signed in pencil by Barry Moser. Publisher's full blue morocco, spine lettered in silver. Top edge trimmed, others uncut as issued. A very fine copy in the original (faded) publisher's blue cloth cloth slipcase with printed spine label. "Barry Moser's intricate boxwood engravings were intended as informative depictions of the whaling industry in general rather than Melville's story in particular, thus leaving "the Pequod, Ahab, and Moby-Dick described only by Melville's words." In order to render his subject matter with authentic detail, Moser spent many hours doing research at whaling and maritime museums in New England and San Francisco. This project marks his only collaboration with Andrew Hoyem, proprietor of the Press. The sixth book issued by Arion Press, Moby-Dick went into production more than ten years after Robert Grabhorn and Andrew Hoyem began planning it." (Prospectus). One of the most important and majestic private press books produced in America. Moser has said, "Moby-Dick was the project which broke more new ground for me than any other.." "The printing commenced in March of 1978 and was completed in May of 1979" (Colophon). "Historically, the two great typographical edifices of West Coast printing are the Grabhorn Leaves of Grass and the Nash Divine Comedy. Now the Arion Press Moby-Dick takes its place beside them. This constitutes a feat of craftsmanship unexcelled in modern printing." (William Everson, Fine Print.) In the 1990's The Grolier Club named this edition as one of the most beautiful books of the twentieth century. Pennyroyal, A Miscellany, 8. Arion Press, 6. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 04811
USD 19500.00 [Appr.: EURO 16624.25 | £UK 15198.75 | JP¥ 2056840]
Keywords: [MOSER, Barry, illustrator] MELVILLE, Herman Movable Books Children's Books Books in French Illustrated Books Fine Bindings Fine Printing Literature

 PARRISH, MAXFIELD, ILLUSTRATOR; IRVING, WASHINGTON, History of New York, A.
PARRISH, MAXFIELD, ILLUSTRATOR; IRVING, WASHINGTON
History of New York, A.
New York: R.H. Russell, 1900. One of 100 Deluxe Copies with the Plates in Two States [PARRISH, Maxfield, illustrator]. IRVING, Washington. A History of New York from the Beginning of the World to the End of the Dutch Dynasty. Containing, among Many Surprising and Curious Matters, the Unutterable Ponderings of Walter the Doubter, the Disastrous Projects of William the Testy, and the Chivalric Achievements of Peter the Headstrong --- the Three Dutch Governors of New Amsterdam; Being the Only Authentic History of the Times that Ever Hath Been or Ever Will Be Published by Diedrich Knickerbocker.. The whole Embellish'd by Eight Pictures from the Hand of Maxfield Parrish, Esqre. New York: R.H. Russell, 1900. Printed by D.B. Updike, The Merrymount Press, Boston (verso of title-page). Edition DeLuxe, one of 100 copies signed by the publisher. Folio (12 3/8 x 9 inches; 314 x 228 mm.). xxiv, 298, [1], [1 blank] pp. Title-page printed in red and black. Eight black and white plates in two states, with the proofs before letterpress printed on Japon Vellum. Publisher's DeLuxe presentation binding of full dark green morocco, spine with five raised bands, lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt turn-ins, top edge gilt. Affixed to the front paste-down is the Publishers rectangular label printed in red "This edition is limited to / one hundred signed copies, / of which this is No. "26 / R. H. Russell". Spine slightly faded, slight offsetting from turn-ins onto endpapers. A fine copy. "Parrish began a series of drawings in the spring of 1898 to illustrate the well-known book Knickerbocker's History of New York. A delightful parody on the history of colonial New York written by Washington Irving in 1809, Diedrich Knickerbocker's history was reprinted with Parrish's drawings in 1900 by R.H. Russell of New York. The artist worked the series into his schedule of commissions for magazine and poster designs, finishing the last of the nine drawings in September, 1899, a year and a half after the first one was begun. Parrish's visual interpretations of Washington Irving's Knickerbocker characters were as amusing as the text for which they were created. In depicting Oloffe Van Kortlandt's dream of the future New York (Oloffe, by selecting the site for New Amsterdam,became America's first great land speculator), Parrish set him against a turn-of-the-century Manhattan skyline. The portly little dreamer, perched in a treetop, reflects the burlesque humor of Irving's satirical history. Washington Irving characterized the American Indian as the innocent victim of the European settlers' greed, describing the Indian race as one which lived in harmony with its environment until "the benevolent inhabitants of Europe.. [beheld] their sad condition.. [and] immediately went to work to ameliorate and improve it. They introduced among them rum, gin, brandy, and the other comforts of life.. An Indian man, still reacting from the sting of a swallow of strong alcohol, appears somewhat uncertain about this gift from the white man in Parrish's illustration for this passage. The two-dimensional drawing, in ink, disregards linear perspective and, with the contrasting shading in lithographic crayon to give volume to the figure, creates an unusual juxtaposition of sizes and distances which adds significantly to the interest of the composition. The distant windmill is drawn with the same attention to minute detail as the demijohn sitting on the wall in the foreground. In both his drawings and his paintings the artist regularly exercised with great skill his preference for giving equal attention to details near and distant. (Coy Ludwig, Maxfield Parrish, pp. 25-26). .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 02940
USD 4500.00 [Appr.: EURO 3836.5 | £UK 3507.5 | JP¥ 474655]
Keywords: IRVING, Washington Illustrated Books Signed Limited Edition Gift Books

 RACKHAM, ARTHUR, ILLUSTRATOR; FORD, JULIA ELLSWORTH; FORD, LAUREN, Imagina
RACKHAM, ARTHUR, ILLUSTRATOR; FORD, JULIA ELLSWORTH; FORD, LAUREN
Imagina
New York: Duffield & Company, 1914. With Two Full-Page Color Plates by Arthur Rackham [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. FORD, Julia Ellsworth. Imagina. With Illustrations by Arthur Rackham and Lauren Ford. New York: Duffield & Company, 1914. First edition. Quarto (9 1/2 x 7 5/16 inches; x 242 x 185 mm.). [12], 178, [1], [1, blank] pp. Two color plates by Arthur Rackham (including frontispiece) and numerous black and white drawings in the text by Lauren Ford. Pages 171/172 with lower corner crease, pages 173-176 with neat repairs on upper blank margin. Publisher's light blue cloth pictorially stamped and lettered in gilt on front cover and lettered in gilt on spine. Pictorial end-papers in pale blue and white by Lauren Ford. Extremities of binding a little faded, some slight wear to top and and bottom of spine and corners. A good copy of the scarce first edition. A wee young, motherless boy, a dreamer who secretly loves poetry, yearns to be held and loved by the beautiful woman he has conjured in his mind in the dim moonlight - Imagina - and communes with trees, birds, flowers, and his dog, Kit, all of whom understand and accept him as he is rather than how his no-nonsense guardian would prefer him to be. "Julia Ellsworth Ford was a New York socialite, art collector and patron, and author of children's books. She was married to Simeon Ford, a financier and co-owner of the Grand Union Hotel in New York. Ford presided over a salon that included the Lebanese mystic Kahlil Gibran, Irish poet W. B. Yeats, and American dancer Isadora Duncan. Her published works include: Simeon Solomon: An Appreciation (1908), Imagina (1914), and Snickerty Nick (1919), among others" (Yale University, Julia Ellsworth Ford papers). Riall, p. 123. See Latimore and Haskell, p. 42. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 03940
USD 250.00 [Appr.: EURO 213.25 | £UK 195 | JP¥ 26370]
Keywords: Ford, Julia Ellsworth Ford, Lauren Illustrated Books Children's Books Fairies Children's Books Illustrated Books

 RACKHAM, ARTHUR, ILLUSTRATOR; IRVING, WASHINGTON, Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the
RACKHAM, ARTHUR, ILLUSTRATOR; IRVING, WASHINGTON
Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the
Philadelphia: George G. Harrap & Co. 1928. Arthur Rackham Awakens Sleepy Hollow [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. IRVING, Washington. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Philadelphia: David McKay Company, [1928]. Limited to 250 numbered copies for England and 125 copies for the United States. This un-numbered and unsigned copy being one of the 125 for the US. Quarto (10 3/16 x 8 inches; 262 x 203 mm.). 102, [1], [1, blank] pp. Eight mounted color plates and thirty drawings in black and white. Publisher's vellum boards gilt lettered and ornamented, with gilt vignette. Top edge gilt, others untrimmed. A fine copy, partially uncut. By 1928, the traditional Rackham book - freely and lavishly illustrated, and lushly produced - was, culturally no longer in fashion nor financially feasible. Artistically, Rackham's work was being overshadowed by a younger generation. Publisher George Harrap stepped in, took up the challenge, and, through production economies, published a new kind of Rackham book. But if the volumes were not as spectacular as in the past, the artwork was no less impressive. Latimore and Haskell, pp. 63-64. Riall, pp. 164-165. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 02884
USD 1350.00 [Appr.: EURO 1151 | £UK 1052.25 | JP¥ 142397]
Keywords: IRVING, Washington American Literature Children's Books Illustrated Books Children's Books Illustrated Books Horror Signed Limited Edition

 RACKHAM, ARTHUR, ILLUSTRATOR; IRVING, WASHINGTON, Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the
RACKHAM, ARTHUR, ILLUSTRATOR; IRVING, WASHINGTON
Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the
London: George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd. 1928. Arthur Rackham Awakens Sleepy Hollow [RACKHAM, Arthur, illustrator]. IRVING, Washington. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham. London: George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd. [1928]. First trade edition. Quarto (9 13/16 x 7 1/2 inches; 250 x 191 mm.). 102, [1], [1, blank] pp. Eight color plates and thirty drawings in black and white. Publisher's green cloth pictorially stamped in gilt on front cover and lettered in gilt on spine. Top edge gilt, others uncut. Pictorial endpapers. Front board very slightly 'bowed' otherwise a near fine copy. By 1928, the traditional Rackham book - freely and lavishly illustrated, and lushly produced - was, culturally no longer in fashion nor financially feasible. Artistically, Rackham's work was being overshadowed by a younger generation. Publisher George Harrap stepped in, took up the challenge, and, through production economies, published a new kind of Rackham book. But if the volumes were not as spectacular as in the past, the artwork was no less impressive. Latimore and Haskell, pp. 63-64. Riall, pp. 164-165. .
David Brass Rare Books (ABAA/ILAB)Professional seller
Book number: 03638
USD 350.00 [Appr.: EURO 298.5 | £UK 273 | JP¥ 36918]
Keywords: IRVING, Washington American Literature Children's Books Illustrated Books Children's Books Illustrated Books

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