Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.: Americana
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(CLAY, HENRY). O'HANLON, JOHN R
Henry Clay: A Lecture, by John R. O'Hanlon
Circa, [1890]. [1890]. Circa, [1890]. [1890]. Fair. - Small quarto [8 inches high by 5-3/4 inches], softcover bound in printed tan wraps. The wraps are soiled & stained with the corners lightly creased & with a short tear to the front edge of the front wrap. 21 pages. There are small stains to the bottom edges of the leaves & the top page corners are lightly creased. Good only.

Rare. There are no copies in WorldCat. Fair .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 24027
USD 15.00 [Appr.: EURO 12.5 | £UK 11 | JP¥ 1641]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; HENRY CLAY; POLITICIAN; JOHN R. O'HANLON; LECTURE.

 
SOCIETY OF THE COCHLEAUREATI.
Presentation of the Wooden Spoon. (Program).
(New Haven, CT: Yale College), (1855). (1855). - Octavo, softcover. A sheet of cream paper is folded once to form 4 pages, each 8-1/2 inches high by 6 inches wide. The title page lists the Committee of Arrangements and is illustrated in black & cream with the insignia of the Cochleaureatorum. The event's program is listed on the 2nd & 3rd pages and the 4th page is blank. There is a small area of staining to he 3rd page and the program has been folded in half horizontally with several additional lighter folds. Very good. The program is headed "Order of Exercises at the Presentation of the Wooden Spoon, by the Junior Class in Yale College, At Brewster's Hall, Monday Evening, June 11th, 1855." The program lists activities including speeches, "Spoon Addresses", colloquies and music by the band. The texts of three original poems are printed together with lists of the music to which they are to be sung. The music includes "Farewell My Lilly Dear" by Stephen Foster and "Hazel Dell" by George Frederick Root". The wooden Spoon Ceremony originated at one of the colleges of Cambridge University in England .A jackknife was given to the homeliest man in the class, a cane to the handsomest and a wooden spoon to the man who ate the most. This tradition evolved over time and from 1847 the spoon was awarded to the junior class member with the lowest grades and then, as noted in an 1856 New York Times article, to the recipient for "his powers as a wit, his talent as a speaker, or his capacity to please the ladies". By the time of the present ceremony, the award had become a popularity contest. David Alan Richards in "Skulls and Keys: The Hidden History of Yale's Secret Societies" [NY: Pegasus Books, 2017] writes that from 1854 the junior class was electing a Spoon committee named "Society of the Cochleaurerati" [from the Latin cochlear, for spoon, and Laureatus , crowned with laurel]. "It was a classic secret society, with closed meetings, small gold spoons nearly an inch and a half long worn on the vest lapel, and a 'midnight doxology' sung after gatherings." Those elected to the Spoon committee were said by Lyman Bagg in "Four Years at Yale" [1871] to be the "wittiest, most popular, genial and gentlemanly of the class. The Spoon Man was chosen by the committee from among their number and was thus regarded as the best of the best. The Spoon Exhibition, as the ceremony was called, became the highlight of the college season, attracting a larger and more remarkable audience than any other event in New Haven. RARE. Good .
Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 36218
USD 275.00 [Appr.: EURO 229 | £UK 198 | JP¥ 30080]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; SECRET SOCIETIES; YALE COLLEGE; 1855 PRESENTATION OF THE WOODEN SPOON; SOCIETY OF THE COCHLEAUREATI; PROGRAM; NINETEENTH CENTURY; 19TH CENTURY.

 
CODERE, HELEN
Fighting with Property: A Study of Kwakiutl Potlatching and Warfare 1792-1930. With Tribal and Linguistic Map of Vancouver Island and Adjacent Territory Drawn and Compiled by Vincent Kotschar
New York: J.J. Augustin Publisher, [circa 1950]. [circa 1950]. New York: J.J. Augustin Publisher, [circa 1950]. [circa 1950]. Very good. - Octavo, light green cloth titled in gilt on the spine. The edges of the covers are faded and the tail of the spine is slightly chipped. viii &136 pages, with a frontispiece, textual and full-page illustrations and a folding map by Vincent Kotschar. There is a tiny tear to the edge of the map. The endpapers are slightly foxed. Very good.

"Monographs of the American Ethnological Society Edited by Marian W. Smith. XVIII."

Inscribed by the cartographer Vincent Kotschar on the front endpaper, signed "Vin". Very good .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 4838
USD 50.00 [Appr.: EURO 41.75 | £UK 36 | JP¥ 5469]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; CANADIANA; CANADIAN INDIANS; NATIVE AMERICANS; LINGUISTICS; TRIBAL; MAP; VANCOUVER ISLAND; VINCENT KOTSCHAR; SIGNED; AUTOGRAPH; INSCRIBED; CARTOGRAPHER; ILLUSTRATIONS; HELEN CODERE; FIGHTING WITH PROPERTY; STUDY; KWAKIUTL POTLATCHING AND WARFAR

 
COE, MICHAEL D
The Maya
New York/Washington: Frederick A. Praeger, (1969). (1969). New York/Washington: Frederick A. Praeger, (1969). (1969). Good. - Octavo, soft cover bound in pictorial green wraps. The wraps are lightly rubbed with the head & tail of the spine lightly chipped. There is some staining to the rear wrap & spine. 252 pages plus plate section including 83 full- & half-page black-and-white illustrations. Also with black-and- white textual illustrations. The fore-edge is foxed & there is occasional light foxing to the text pages. Good.

Fourth printing.

Ancient Peoples and Places, General Editor: Glyn Daniel, Volume 52. Good .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 5501
USD 10.00 [Appr.: EURO 8.5 | £UK 7.25 | JP¥ 1094]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; MEXICO; CENTRAL AMERICA; MAYANS; NATIVE AMERICANS; AMERICAN INDIANS; THE MAYA; MICHAEL D. COE; ARCHAEOLOGY; ARCHEOLOGY; ILLUSTRATIONS; CALENDAR; LINGUISTICS; RELIGION; YUCATAN.

 
COGSWELL, REV. WILLIAM, D.D.
The New Hampshire Repository: Devoted to Education, Literature and Religion. Vol. II. No. 1. October 1846. (Cover Title).
Gilmanton, NH: printed by Alfred Prescott, 1846. 1846. Gilmanton, NH: printed by Alfred Prescott, 1846. 1846. Fair. - Octavo, softcover bound in printed wrappers sewn with cream cord. The periodical is partially disbound with most of the backstrip missing and with the upper & lower ends of the wraps detached. The wraps are bumped & soiled with a few small stains & with their edges lightly chipped. There is a small hole in the front wrap. 84 & [2] pages, including text on rear wrap. Illustrated with a frontispiece portrait of Samuel Worcester & tables. There is light staining to the left margin of the frontispiece & offsetting from the frontispiece to the first text page. The page corners are bumped & there are occasional small stains. A complete copy.

Among the contents of this quarterly New Hampshire periodical are a memoir of the Rev. Samuel Worcester, sketches of Dartmouth College alumni, biographical notices of physicians in several towns, the history of school books in New England and numerous statistical tables.

Scarce. Fair .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 34952
USD 45.00 [Appr.: EURO 37.5 | £UK 32.5 | JP¥ 4922]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; NEW HAMPSHIRE; PERIODICAL; QUARTERLY; RELIGION; EDUCATION; LITERATURE; THE NEW HAMPSHIRE REPOSITORY VOL. II, NO. 1; REV. WILLIAM COGSWELL; MEMOIR OF REV. SAMUEL WORCESTER; DARTMOUTH COLLEGE ALUMNI; BIOGRAPHIES OF PHYSICIANS; NEW ENGLAND SCHOOL

 
(VASSAR COLLEGE).
Historical Sketch of Vassar College. Founded at Poughkeepsie, N.Y. , January 18, 1861. Prepared in Compliance with an Invitation from the Commissions of the Bureau of Education, Representing the Department of the Interior in Matters Relating to the National Centennial of 1876.
New York: S.W. Green, Printer, 1876. 1876. THE RARE FIRST EDITION - Quarto, 11-5/8 inches high by 9-1/4 inches wide. Softcovers, bound in printed light grayish white wraps. The covers are stained, rubbed and soiled with pieces chipped out from the front edges of the front & rear covers and a couple of chips out from the top edge of the rear cover and a tiny chip to the top edge of the front. The spine has largely perished and there is a small tape repair near the bottom of the spine. [ii] & 54 pages, illustrated with a frontispiece map of "Vassar College and Grounds, Surveyed by the Class of '78 under Direction of Prof. Priscilla H. Braislin" and numerous textual illustrations. Good. First edition. RARE. Good .
Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 96292
USD 395.00 [Appr.: EURO 329 | £UK 284.25 | JP¥ 43205]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; EDUCATION; COLLEGES; UNIVERSITIES; VASSAR COLLEGE; WOMEN'S STUDIES; POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK; NEW YORK STATE; HISTORY; NINETEENTH CENTURY; FIRST EDITION; 1ST EDITION; 19TH CENTURY; HISTORICAL SKETCH OF VASSAR COLLEGE. FOUNDED AT POUGHKEEPSIE,

 
(HARVARD COLLEGE)
The Rules and by-Laws of the Board of Overseers of Harvard College. To Which Is Appended the College Charter, with Sundry Acts and Instruments Relating to the Powers and Duties of the Overseers
Boston: Printed by John Wilson and Son, 1857. 1857. Boston: Printed by John Wilson and Son, 1857. 1857. Fair. - 12mo, limp brown cloth titled in gilt within a blind stamped decorative frame on the front cover. The covers are rubbed with some wear to the corners and head and tail of the spine. There is a split to the cloth in the middle of the front joint. 60 pages. The endpapers are soiled and the leaves are darkened. Good. Fair .
Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 23251
USD 10.00 [Appr.: EURO 8.5 | £UK 7.25 | JP¥ 1094]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; EDUCATION; UNIVERSITY; CHARTER; HARVARD COLLEGE; MASSACHUSETS; RULES; BY-LAWS; REGULATIONS; BOARD OF OVERSEERS; JOHN WILSON AND SON; BOSTON; CAMBRIDGE; NINETEENTH CENTURY; 19TH CENTURY; HISTORY.

 
COLVER, NATHANIEL; DAVIS, JONATHAN.
Debate on Slavery. (in the Journal of the American Baptist Anti-Slavery Convention, Vol. 1, No. 3).
Worcester, MA: Executive Committee of the Convention, July 1841. July 1841. Worcester, MA: Executive Committee of the Convention, July 1841. July 1841. Fair. - Octavo, completely disbound. Mild ex-library with several ink numerals & the remains of a stamp on the first page. There is a hole & a tear on the first page with the resulting loss of a few words on its verso. The loss is to part of the introductory matter. There is no loss to the text of the debate. Pages [73]-180. The pages are toned & lightly foxed. Good working copy.

Justin A. Smith in "Memoir of Rev. Nathaniel Colver, D.D: with lectures, plans of sermons, etc". [Boston: Foxcroft, Jr. 1875] provides some background for this debate: "In the ministry and in the churches, that view of human slavery which chiefly commanded attention, was that which regarded it in the light of Scripture. Does the Bible sanction slavery? Are the references to this subject, whether in the Old Testament or the New, such as to suggest that the relationship of master and slave has a divine recognition and a divine approval, either express or implied? With this question was associated another: What is the moral character of that act in which one human being holds another in slavery, claims him as property, buys him, sells him, uses his labor without requital, and as a protection to himself in seeking to perpetuate that relation, shuts from the slave's mind, wholly or partially, the light of knowledge? Many were prepared to admit the evil of slavery --its mischievous tendencies, in every way--who would not acknowledge it to be a sin..One of [the] notable occasions on which the discussion of these subjects assumed a form specially characteristic and significant, was that of a session of the American Baptist Antislavery Society, held in Tremont Chapel, Boston, May 26-28, 1841."

Nathaniel Colver proposed the resolution on which the discussion was based: "Resolved. That the system of American slavery, in its essential principles, has no analogy in the servitude tolerated in the Bible; but that, in its origin and continuance, its is defined in the law of man-stealing, and, with whatever mitigating circumstances it may be attended, it is a sin against God." The President of the Convention, Rev. Elon Galusha, was in the Chair. Among those present was Colver's chief opponent, Rev. Jonathan Davis, the pro-slavery pastor of Bethel Baptist Church, Georgia.

The eloquence and acuity of the debate may be judged from the following extracts. Colver quoted from Exodus, xxi, 16: "And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death." "The case stands thus," he argued, "God is the legitimate owner of every man. God has constituted every man the guardian of himself, as a moral being, subject to his laws, with guardian responsibilities as deathless as his being. As a guardian over himself, it is not among his functions to relinquish his charge to the absolute will of another. Whoever, therefore, takes him from himself and subjects him to the will of another,steals him from the guardian with whom God has entrusted him, and he that does that, steals him from God, and, need I add, involves himself in the sin specified in the law under consideration. This, then, Sir, is the sin of man-stealing; and this, Sir, is precisely the work of American slavery.

Mr. Davis replied at length, maintaining the view held by Southern Christians that the relation as it existed amongst them did not differ radically from the relation of master and servant as sanctioned in the Bible, and claiming that those then holding slaves, having received them by inheritance, with all the responsibilities attached, should not be made accountable for the circumstances under which the black man was first brought to American shores. In reply, Colver referred to the law in Leviticus XXV, 46: "First, that law made no distinction of color. The slave law is predicated upon color. Now, if that law ordained slavery, and the brother will have it for his warrant, let him take it as it is. Let the whites, as well as the blacks, come in for a share of its kind provisions. If you are warranted by that law to buy, hold and sell black slaves, you have in it an equal warrant to treat whites in the same manner. I put it to the Brother if, according to his interpretation of that law, he would not be warranted to buy and hold as slaves any foreign white persons who might be brought to the shores of Georgia by a pirate vessel which had captured them? By what Jesuitism is that law by Southern application restricted to colored men?

At a later point in the debate Davis said:"Elder Colver has said that he will relieve me of my troubles about his property so that I may not continue in my guilt. Now I ask Elder Colver if, in addition to that, he will pay me for my slaves, and provide for them. I ask him if he will take them away to New England and raise them from their condition of slavery, and carry out this matter as he should." Colver replied: "I will answer the brother's inquiry by saying that I will relieve him of all his slaves if he will pay them back their hard-earned wages." Davis answered: "I admire the shrewdness of the reply; but honesty requires that I should be paid the full price for having kept them so long. Perhaps, after all, this keeping is not so profitable as is supposed. If you take them, you must take them as they are." "I will take them on those terms," said Mr. Colver, "If you will deduct the extravagant expenses you have obliged them to meet while supporting you and themselves."

Countering an objection that if blacks were emancipated, the two races could not live together, Colver said: "Sir, I am reminded of an anecdote which presents the justice of the matter. A man had two horses, a grey one and a black one. His son said, 'Father, the grey horse kicks the black one and won't stand peaceably with him in the stable. Shall I turn Black out?' 'No' said the old man, 'if Grey won't let Black alone, turn Grey out into the storm;' and justice says, amen." Colver also used Santa Domingo as an example, showing that "under all and any circumstances, Emancipation is safe" [i.e. the slaves would not turn on their masters].

Nathaniel Colver [1794-1870] was a United States Baptist clergyman. In 1839 he was called to Boston where he cooperated in organizing the church later known as Tremont Temple. His ministry was remarkable for its bold, uncompromising and effective warfare upon slavery and intemperance, as well as for its directly spiritual results. Colver was Chairman of the Executive Committee of the American Baptist Antislavery Convention. The American Baptist Antislavery Convention was formed in April 1840 in New York City. In addition to organizing this 1841 debate, the Convention opened correspondence with their brethren in the South and published the letters in a bi-monthly periodical, "Baptist Antislavery Correspondent."

Rare. WorldCat locates 10 copies. Fair .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 34948
USD 500.00 [Appr.: EURO 416.25 | £UK 359.75 | JP¥ 54690]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; SLAVERY; ABOLITIONISM; DEBATE ON SLAVERY; NATHANIEL COLVER; JONATHAN DAVIS; AMERICAN BAPTIST ANTI-SLAVERY CONVENTION; ELON GALUSHA; SANTA DOMINGO; EMANCIPATION; LEVITICUS; EXODUS.

 
[COLWELL, STEPHEN]
The South: A Letter from a Friend in the North / with Special Reference to the Effects of Disunion Upon Slavery
Philadelphia, PA: Printed for the author by C. Sherman & Son, 1856. 1856. Philadelphia, PA: Printed for the author by C. Sherman & Son, 1856. 1856. Fair. - Octavo, softcover bound in printed tan wraps. The rear wrap is lacking. The front wrap is detached & is heavily chipped & lightly foxed with a handwritten numeral in its top corner. 46 pages. There is a bookseller's blind stamp on the title page with a handwritten numeral in the top corner. The page corners are bumped with pieces out of the top corners of the first few leaves & the rear blank is lightly foxed with a piece out of its top corner. The text pages are clean & bright. Fair.

First edition.

This pamphlet is attributed to Stephen Colwell. The author states that as a native of Virginia long resident in Philadelphia, he belongs to a class which is "perhaps better able to keep balanced minds on some of those exciting topics than those who are more immediately engaged-- better than natives of the North or residents of the South." The main topic of his letter is the dispute over slavery. Fair .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 28330
USD 20.00 [Appr.: EURO 16.75 | £UK 14.5 | JP¥ 2188]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; SLAVERY; THE SOUTH: A LETTER FROM A FRIEND IN THE NORTH with Special Reference to the Effects of Disunion upon Slavery; STEPHEN COLWELL; NINETEENTH CENTURY; 19TH CENTURY; PAMPHLET; FIRST EDITION; 1ST EDITION.

 
STRAUS, OSCAR (1850-1926). U.S. SECRETARY OF COMMERCE AND LABOR UNDER PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT, STRAUS WAS THE FIRST JEWISH CABINET SECRETARY.
Autograph Letter Signed by Theodore Roosevelt's Former Secretary of Commerce and Labor Oscar Straus Who Had the Distinction of Being the First Jewish Cabinet Secretary, in Reply to James B. Pond's Invitation to Join His Reception Committee for Maeterlinck's First American Lecture.
New York, December 20, 1919. 1919. - Over 50 words penned on both sides of his 3-1/4 inch high by 5-1/8 inch wide card, embossed with his address "5 West Seventy-Sixth Street / New York" along the top. Oscar Straus is pleased to accept American impresario and lecture agent James B. Pond's invitation to serve on the committee welcoming Maurice Maeterlinck to America. Straus writes "..It gives me pleasure to accept to honor the distinguished man of letters whose fame has spread across the civilized continents". Signed "Oscar S. Straus". There is a small piece out from the top left corner. Very good. President Theodore Roosevelt's Secretary of Commerce and Labor Oscar Straus (1850-1926) was the first Jewish United States Cabinet Secretary. Born in Otterberg, Germany, he emigrated with his family to Talbotton, Georgia and subsequently moved to New York City. A graduate of Columbia Law School, he practiced law before becoming a merchant and subsequently served as President McKinley's United States Minister to the Ottoman Empire and Ambassador to Ottoman Turkey. It was in that capacity that, in 1899, he was asked to approach Sultan Abdul Hamid II in Turkey to request that the Sultan write a letter to the Moro Sulu Muslims of the Philippines requesting that they not resist American occupation and assist the Americans. This was successfully achieved. Sadly, the Moro Rebellion which broke out in 1904 was notorious for the atrocities committed by Americans upon the indigenous people among which was the Moro Crater Massacre in which American forces slaughtered all but 6 of approximately 1,000 Moro natives, including women and children, who had taken refuge in the Bud Dajo crater. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Straus to the position of United States Secretary of Commerce and Labor. His position placed him in charge of the US Bureau of Immigration and he ordered immigration inspectors to work with the Secret Service and the local police to enforce the Anarchist Exclusion Act, deporting immigrants who held Anarchist political beliefs. Straus unsuccessfully ran for the Governorship of New York in 1912. He later became chairman of the public service commision of New York State and was president of the American Jewish Historical Society. James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides. Very good .
Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 36912
USD 150.00 [Appr.: EURO 125 | £UK 108 | JP¥ 16407]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; BUSINESS; UNITED STATES SECRETARY OF COMMERCE AND LABOR; OSCAR STRAUS; MERCHANT;AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED; ALS; SIGNATURE; AUTOGRAPH; TWENTIETH CENTURY 20TH CENTURY; JAMES B. POND; THE J.B. POND LYCEUM BUREAU; LECTURE; MAURICE MAETERLINCK; RECEPT

 STRAUS, OSCAR (1850-1926). U.S. SECRETARY OF COMMERCE AND LABOR UNDER PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT, STRAUS WAS THE FIRST JEWISH CABINET SECRETARY., Autograph Letter Signed by Theodore Roosevelt's Former Secretary of Commerce and Labor Oscar Straus Who Had the Distinction of Being the First Jewish Cabinet Secretary, Asking James B. Pond Details As to When to Assemble in the Green Room As Part of the Reception Committee for Maeterlinck's First American Lecture.
STRAUS, OSCAR (1850-1926). U.S. SECRETARY OF COMMERCE AND LABOR UNDER PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT, STRAUS WAS THE FIRST JEWISH CABINET SECRETARY.
Autograph Letter Signed by Theodore Roosevelt's Former Secretary of Commerce and Labor Oscar Straus Who Had the Distinction of Being the First Jewish Cabinet Secretary, Asking James B. Pond Details As to When to Assemble in the Green Room As Part of the Reception Committee for Maeterlinck's First American Lecture.
New York, December 29, 1919. 1919. - Over 30 words penned on his 3-1/4 inch high by 5-1/8 inch wide card, embossed with his address "5 West Seventy-Sixth Street / New York" along the top. Having accepted American impresario and lecture agent James B. Pond's invitation to serve on the committee welcoming Maurice Maeterlinck to America. Straus requests that Pond "Kindly advise me what hour to assemble in the Green Room". Straus also inquires if he can bring his wife to the event "Can I bring Mrs. Straus with me?" Signed "Oscar S. Straus". There is a small piece out from the top left corner. Very good. President Theodore Roosevelt's Secretary of Commerce and Labor Oscar Straus (1850-1926) was the first Jewish United States Cabinet Secretary. Born in Otterberg, Germany, he emigrated with his family to Talbotton, Georgia and subsequently moved to New York City. A graduate of Columbia Law School, he practiced law before becoming a merchant and subsequently served as President McKinley's United States Minister to the Ottoman Empire and Ambassador to Ottoman Turkey. It was in that capacity that, in 1899, he was asked to approach Sultan Abdul Hamid II in Turkey to request that the Sultan write a letter to the Moro Sulu Muslims of the Philippines requesting that they not resist American occupation and assist the Americans. This was successfully achieved. Sadly, the Moro Rebellion which broke out in 1904 was notorious for the atrocities committed by Americans upon the indigenous people among which was the Moro Crater Massacre in which American forces slaughtered all but 6 of approximately 1,000 Moro natives, including women and children, who had taken refuge in the Bud Dajo crater. In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Straus to the position of United States Secretary of Commerce and Labor. His position placed him in charge of the US Bureau of Immigration and he ordered immigration inspectors to work with the Secret Service and the local police to enforce the Anarchist Exclusion Act, deporting immigrants who held Anarchist political beliefs. Straus unsuccessfully ran for the Governorship of New York in 1912. He later became chairman of the public service commision of New York State and was president of the American Jewish Historical Society. James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides. Very good .
Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 36913
USD 150.00 [Appr.: EURO 125 | £UK 108 | JP¥ 16407]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; BUSINESS; UNITED STATES SECRETARY OF COMMERCE AND LABOR; OSCAR STRAUS; MERCHANT; AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED; ALS; SIGNATURE; AUTOGRAPH; TWENTIETH CENTURY 20TH CENTURY; JAMES B. POND; THE J.B. POND LYCEUM BUREAU; LECTURE; MAURICE MAETERLINCK; RECEP

 
[NATIONAL NEWARK & ESSEX BANKING COMPANY]
Directory of Newark, for 1835-6. With an Historical Sketch. (Facsimile)
[Newark, NJ: National Newark & Essex Banking Company, 1936]. 1936]. [Newark, NJ: National Newark & Essex Banking Company, 1936]. 1936]. Good. - Small octavo, plain tan & gray paper covered boards backed with rust brown cloth. The boards are bumped & slightly darkened around the edges. The head & tail of the spine are rubbed & very lightly chipped. 24 & 102 pages plus 3 pages of ads. The pastedowns & endpapers are lightly spotted & there is minor darkening to the front edges & top corners of the text pages. There are some small pencil markings in the Historical Sketch. Good. Good .
Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 19332
USD 35.00 [Appr.: EURO 29.25 | £UK 25.25 | JP¥ 3828]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; NEW JERSEY; NEWARK; DIRECTORY OF NEWARK FOR 1835-6; HISTORICAL SKETCH; FACSIMILE; NATIONAL NEWARK & ESSEX BANKING COMPANY.

 
(ROSENBACH COMPANY)
The History of America in Documents: Original Autograph Letters, Manuscripts and Source Materials. Part I: The Period of Discovery to the Battle of Yorktown. (Catalogue)
Philadelphia, PA: The Rosenbach Company, 1949. 1949. Philadelphia, PA: The Rosenbach Company, 1949. 1949. Very good. - Large octavo, printed wraps. Heavily stained and chipped. 135 pp. Contents are very good.

462 extraordinary items are fully described and priced. Very good .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 7236
USD 15.00 [Appr.: EURO 12.5 | £UK 11 | JP¥ 1641]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; DOCUMENTS; AUTOGRAPHS; LETTERS; MANUSCRIPTS; CATALOGUE; SALE CATALOGUE; PRICES; ROSENBACH COMPANY. (Americana). THE HISTORY OF AMERICA IN DOCUMENTS: Original Autograph Letters, Manuscripts and Source Materials. Part I: The Period of Discovery

 
(COPELAND'S CONFECTIONERY).
Vintage Photograph of "Copeland's Old Confectionery Shop, East Side of Court, between Brattle and Hanover Streets", in Boston.
Circa [1860s]. [1860s]. - A vintage black & white photograph, approximately 5-1/2 inches high by 3-1/2 inches wide, inlaid within a larger sheet of cream stock, 10-5/8 inches high by 7 inches wide. The edges of the mount are slightly darkened. Near fine. Titled within the photograph under the image. The photograph depicts the corner facade of Copeland's old Confectionery Shop located at 85-87 Court Street in Boston. The corner of the B.S. Wright & Co. Oyster House is seen at right. Very good .
Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 28040
USD 65.00 [Appr.: EURO 54.25 | £UK 46.75 | JP¥ 7110]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; MASSACHUSETTS; BOSTON; PHOTOGRAPH; PHOTOGRAPHY; COPELAND'S OLD CONFECTIONERY SHOP, EAST SIDE OF COURT, BETWEEN BRATTLE AND HANOVER STREETS; VINTAGE; ARCHITECTURE; HISTORY; CONFECTIONERY; CANDIES; NINETEENTH CENTURY; 19TH CENTURY.

 
(PAN-AMERICAN CONFERENCE)
International American Conference. Reports of Committees and Discussions Thereon. (4 Volumes)
Washington: Government Printing Office, 1890. 1890. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1890. 1890. Very good. - Quarto, 11-3/4 inches high by 9 inches wide. Deep burgundy cloth titled in gilt on the spines. The covers are bumped and rubbed with occasional small stains. There is a tiny split to the cloth at the top of the front joint of the first volume. The volumes are respectively paginated [1]-554; 555-1203; 1-343; and 1-375. Very good.

The complete report of the first Pan-American conference which brought together delegates from the U.S.A. with those from the countries of South and Central America, with much detail about the historical efforts which were undertaken throughout the 19th century to bring these many countries to the same table.

Volume 3 contains a report on the travel of the delegates in the United States. Very good .

Blue Mountain Books & Manuscripts, Ltd.Professional seller
Book number: 23230
USD 85.00 [Appr.: EURO 70.75 | £UK 61.25 | JP¥ 9297]
Catalogue: Americana
Keywords: AMERICANA; HISTORY; SOUTH AMERICA; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; URUGUAY; JAMES G. BLAINE; REPORT; PAN-AMERICAN; INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE; COMMITTEES; DISCUSSIONS; SET; NICARAGUA; COSTA RICA; ARGENTINA; HONDURAS; GUATEMALA; SALVADOR; ECUADOR; BOLIVIA; CHILI;

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