found: 4 books

 
ACKERSDIJCK, JAN (1790- 1861)
Verhaal Eener Reize in Rusland, Gedaan in Het Jaar 1835. 2 Volumes.
. Groningen, W. van Boekeren 1840. [VI],XIV,302; [IV],VI,[2],363p. With engraved frontispiece to volume 1. Contemp. half black calf leather binding with leather corners, gilt titles and decorations on the spines, marbled paper covered boards . Text sl. darkened, which is usual for this work, pinhole in margin on pp. 130/131, First (only) edition. An account of the author's three months crossing through Russia, with visits to St Petersburg, Moscow, Gorki and Kazan, for the greater part written in the form of a diary. It is regarded as one of the most interesting and one of the most reliable sources for the knowledge of Russia in the early nineteenth century, full of details about Russian history, culture, daily life, administration, institutions, commerce, etc. Jan Ackersdijck had been a lawyer in Utrecht and in 1825 was appointed professor of political sciences in Liège. After the Belgian revolution of 1830 he left the Southern Netherlands and the following year was appointed professor in Utrecht. He there occupied himself with a variety of subjects, public law, political history, colonial policy, rural economy, etc. He also lectured on statistics and economic theory, and for that has been credited with being the first academic economist in the Netherlands. Though he published a number of smaller works on these subjects he did not expose his economic theory in a more systematic way, yet he is said to have considered himself a follower of Malthus. He was convinced of the importance of own observation of foreign countries and therefore made travels to most European countries. The present book on his travel to Russia is his only more extended publication. He travelled all over Europe to collect data on the geography, population, society, trade, etc. paving the way and laying the foundation for the disciplines that later in the 19th century would be called 'economy' and 'sociology'. Ackersdijck left Utrecht in June 1835, and travelled by way of Hamburg, Kiel and Lübeck to St. Petersburg, and from there to Novgorod, Moscow, Nizhniy Novgorod, Kazan, Simbirsk, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Hamburg to return to Utrecht in October of the same year. SEE: Cat. Russica A135. NNBW IV,c.9. Butter p.54, Muller, Bibl. Neerlando-Russe 13; Cat. NHSM I, p.196; Tiele, Bibl. 24; WorldCat shows 2 copies.
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Book number: F2576
GBP 145.00 [Appr.: EURO 168.5 US$ 188.15 | JP¥ 20398]
Catalogue: Russian History
Keywords: Russian Travel Russia Rare

 
BURGH, HENRY
18e Eeuwse Plattegrond Van Rotterdam Met Legenda / 18th Century Map of Rotterdam + Amsterdam Panorama.
. Copper engraving , 147 x 187 mm. From: : Modern history: or the present state of all nations. Vol. VIII: Continuation of the German Empire: North part of Upper Saxony, Lower Saxony, Upper and Lower Rhine, and Westphalia, with the present state of the United Netherlands. door SALMON, [THOMAS], Published by London, James Crokatt, 1728. image available.
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Book number: F3258
GBP 14.50 [Appr.: EURO 17 US$ 18.81 | JP¥ 2040]
Catalogue: Cartography
Keywords: Cartography Netherlands Map

 
GRASWINCKEL DIRCK INGELEID EN VERZORGD DOOR GEERTEN GOSSAERT INTRODUCED AND EDITED BY GEERTEN GOSSAERT
De Vierlingen Van Den Heer Van Pybrac. Uit Het Frans in Het Nederlands En in Het Latijn Vertaald Door Mr. Dirck Graswinckel. Ingeleid En Verzorgd Door Geerten Gossaert.
. Utrecht, Stichting de Roos, 1955. Hardcover without dust jacket as issued , top edge gilt, XLVIII + 136 [2] pp. all text pages clean and unmarked, but sl. darkened, end papers discoloured / . 140pp. Kop verguld. Typografie en band Aldert Witte. Gezet uit de Lutetia, de Romanée en de Open Kapitalen van J. van Krimpen, en gedrukt door Van Amerongen in rood en zwart op Eenhoorn Propatria antiek van Van Gelder Nummer 173 van een oplage van 175 genummerde exemplaren.
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Book number: F3227
GBP 7.50 [Appr.: EURO 8.75 US$ 9.73 | JP¥ 1055]
Catalogue: Private Press
Keywords: Netherlands Dutch Bibliophile Rare Limited Private Press

 
NICOLIS, F.
Bell Beakers Today: Pottery, People, Culture, Symbols in Prehistoric Europe
. 2001, 2 volumes, 736pp. black and white illustrations, HB. These two volumes present over sixty contributions, from and international colloquium held in Trento, Italy, in 1998, which provide an invaluable overview of the Bell Beaker culture and recent developments in scholarship. The papers cover sites and discoveries in Spain and Portugal, Italy and Sicily, France, the Netherlands, Britain and Ireland, eastern and central Europe, as well as more thematic discussions of, for example, radiocarbon dating, metallurgy, society and culture, European contacts, technology, tools, gender and burial rituals. The majority of the papers are in English, although most European languages are represented along with English abstracts. One of the most puzzling archaeological phenomena of prehistoric Europe is the widespread appearance of a specific form of ceramic vessel, a decorated, thin-walled, handleless drinking cup known as a bell beaker, throughout western and central continental Europe and the British Isles during the second half of the third millennium B.C. The bell beakers were often found in male burials that also included archer's wrist guards of polished stone, V-perforated buttons (with two holes drilled from one side at an angle until they converged to form a single V-shaped channel), and copper daggers. Archaeologists refer to this phenomenon as the "Bell Beaker complex" or, more efficiently, simply as "Bell Beakers." The earliest form of Bell Beaker called the Maritime Bell Beaker probably originated in the vibrant copper-using communities of the Tagus estuary in Portugal around 2800 - 2700 BC and spread from there to many parts of western Europe. An overview of all available sources from southern Germany concluded that the Bell Beaker Culture was a new and independent culture in that area, contemporary with the Corded Ware Culture.This conclusion was supported by a review of radiocarbon dates for Bell Beaker across Europe, which showed that the earliest dates for Bell Beaker were 2900 BC in Iberia. This makes the style contemporary with Corded Ware, but beginning in a different region of Europe. Bell Beaker has been suggested as a candidate for an early Indo-European culture, more specifically, an ancestral proto-Celtic. Despite the date this work came out in 2006.
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Book number: 092258-4
GBP 59.50 [Appr.: EURO 69.25 US$ 77.2 | JP¥ 8370]
Catalogue: Archaeology
Keywords: Archaeology, Glockenbecherkultur Prehistory, Europe Weblists

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