found: 6 books

 
BENSLY, R., HARRIS, J. & BURKITT, F. (TRANSCRIBERS),
The Four Gospels in Syriac.
. Transcribed from the Sinaitic Palimpsest. Introduced by .A.S.Lewis. Cambridge, 1894 (1st ed); large qto (11 x 9 in); xlviii, 318pp; bound in crisp, new cloth (title gilt); contents near-fine. [ DL 2/4 ].
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Book number: 030112
GBP 150.00 [Appr.: EURO 164.25 US$ 193.1 | JP¥ 21085]
Keywords: Theology Wim Meeuws Ancient Near East Transcriptions Religious Texts Ancient Languages Sinaitic Syriac

 
BRESC, HENRI & YÛSUF RÂGIB
Le Sultan Mérinide Abû L-Hassan ‘Alî Et Jacques Iii de Majorque. Du Traité de Paix Au Pacte Secret
. 2011, ( Cahiers des annales islamologiques 32 ) 140pp. coloured wrappers
¶ À la différence des Archives du monde arabe, les chancelleries européennes ont conservé de nombreux traités de paix et de commerce passés au Moyen Âge avec les États musulmans. La Bibliothèque nationale de Paris renferme en particulier un document particulièrement riche et éclairant, le traité de paix passé le 15 avril 1339 à Tlemcen entre le souverain mérinide Abu- l-H.asan ‘Ali-, alors au faîte de sa puissance militaire, et les ambassadeurs de Jacques III, roi de Majorque. Le traité jette une vive lumière sur les relations politiques et économiques entre les États riverains de la Méditerranée occidentale et sur le discours diplomatique qui les traduit. Le Maroc mérinide constituait pour le roi de Majorque un recours et un allié contre son suzerain, son parent et ennemi Pierre IV d’Aragon. L’alliance projetée ne sera pas conclue, et le royaume de Majorque annexé en 1343 à l’Aragon.
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Book number: F2624
GBP 8.00 [Appr.: EURO 9 US$ 10.3 | JP¥ 1125]
Catalogue: Islam
Keywords: Ancient Near East

 
FACSIMILE-
Codex Sinaiticus
. This high quality facsimile reunites the Codex Sinaiticus from its current locations around the world. Makes one of the most significant Christian texts available. Excellent value for a 20lb text. the Codex Sinaiticus is one of the world's most remarkable books. Written in Greek in the fourth century, it is the oldest surviving complete New Testament, and one of the two oldest manuscripts of the whole Bible. No other early manuscript of the Christian Bible has been so extensively corrected, and the significance of Codex Sinaiticus for the reconstruction of the Christian Bible's original text, the history of the Bible and the history of western book making is immense. Since 2002, a major international project has been creating an electronic version of the manuscript. This magnificent printed facsimile reunites the text, now divided between the British Library, the National Library of Russia, St Catherine’s Monastery, Mt Sinai and Leipzig University Library. Codex Sinaiticus, a manuscript of the Christian Bible written in the middle of the fourth century, contains the earliest complete copy of the Christian New Testament. The hand-written text is in Greek. The New Testament appears in the original vernacular language (koine) and the Old Testament in the version, known as the Septuagint, that was adopted by early Greek-speaking Christians. In the Codex, the text of both the Septuagint and the New Testament has been heavily annotated by a series of early correctors.The significance of Codex Sinaiticus for the reconstruction of the Christian Bible's original text, the history of the Bible and the history of Western book-making is immense. Hardback, 832 pages, 340 x 420mm, 822 colour illustrations.Codex Sinaiticus is one of the world's most remarkable books. Written in Greek in the fourth century, it is the oldest surviving complete New Testament, and one of the two oldest manuscripts of the whole Bible. No other early manuscript of the Christian Bible has been so extensively corrected, and the significance of Codex Sinaiticus for the reconstruction of the Christian Bible's original text, the history of the Bible and the history of western book making is immense. Since 2002, a major international project has been creating an electronic version of the manuscript. This magnificent printed facsimile reunites the text, now divided between the British Library, the National Library of Russia, St Catherine's Monastery, Mt Sinai and Leipzig University Library. Codex Sinaiticus, a manuscript of the Christian Bible written in the middle of the fourth century, contains the earliest complete copy of the Christian New Testament. The hand-written text is in Greek. The New Testament appears in the original vernacular language (koine) and the Old Testament in the version, known as the Septuagint, that was adopted by early Greek-speaking Christians. In the Codex, the text of both the Septuagint and the New Testament has been heavily annotated by a series of early correctors.The significance of Codex Sinaiticus for the reconstruction of the Christian Bible's original text, the history of the Bible and the history of Western book-making is immense. The name 'Codex Sinaiticus' literally means 'the Sinai Book'. It reflects two important aspects of the manuscript: its form and a very special place in its history. 'Codex' means 'book'. By the time Codex Sinaiticus was written, works of literature were increasingly written on sheets that were folded and bound together in a format that we still use to this day. This book format was steadily replacing the roll format which was more widespread just a century before when texts were written on one side of a series of sheets glued together to make a roll. These rolls were made of animal skin (like most of the Dead Sea Scrolls) or the papyrus plant (commonly used for Greek and Latin literature). Using the papyrus codex was a distinctive feature of early Christian culture. The pages of Codex Sinaiticus however are of prepared animal skin called parchment. This marks it out as standing at an important transition in book history. Before it we see many examples of Greek and Latin texts on papyrus roll or papyrus codex, but almost no traces of parchment codices. After it, the parchment codex becomes normative. During its history , particularly its modern history, parts of Codex Sinaiticus were also known by other names. The 43 leaves which are now at Leipzig University Library were published in 1846 as 'Codex Frederico-Augustanus' in honour of Frederick Augustus II, King of Saxony, who was the patron of the German Biblical scholar and editor of Codex Sinaiticus, Constantine Tischendorf. The 347 leaves now in The British Library were previously known as 'Codex Sinaiticus Petropolitanus', as they were kept in St Petersburg between 1863 and 1933. Codex Sinaiticus is generally dated to the fourth century, and sometimes more precisely to the middle of that century. This is based on study of the handwriting, known as palaeographical analysis. Only one other nearly complete manuscript of the Christian Bible Codex Vaticanus (kept in the Vatican Library in Rome) is of a similarly early date. The only manuscripts of Christian scripture that are definitely of an earlier date than Codex Sinaiticus contain small portions of the text of the Bible.As it survives today, Codex Sinaiticus comprises just over 400 large leaves of prepared animal skin, each of which measures 380mm high by 345mm wide. On these parchment leaves is written around half of the Old Testament and Apocrypha (the Septuagint), the whole of the New Testament, and two early Christian texts not found in modern Bibles. Most of the first part of the manuscript (containing most of the so-called historical books, from Genesis to 1 Chronicles) is now missing and presumed to be lost. The Septuagint includes books which many Protestant Christian denominations place in the Apocrypha. Those present in the surviving part of the Septuagint in Codex Sinaiticus are 2 Esdras, Tobit, Judith, 1 & 4 Maccabees, Wisdom and Sirach. The number of the books in the New Testament in Codex Sinaiticus is the same as that in modern Bibles in the West, but the order is different. The Letter to the Hebrews is placed after Paul's Second Letter to the Thessalonians, and the Acts of the Apostles between the Pastoral and Catholic Epistles. The two other early Christian texts are an Epistle by an unknown writer claiming to be the Apostle Barnabas, and 'The Shepherd', written by the early second-century Roman writer, Hermas. Codex Sinaiticus was copied by more than one scribe. Constantine Tischendorf identified four in the nineteenth century. Subsequent research decided that there were three, but it is possible that a fourth (different from Tischendorf's fourth scribe) can be identified. Each of the three undisputed scribes has a distinctive way of writing which can be identified with practice. Each also had a distinctive way of spelling many sounds, particularly vowels which scribes often wrote phonetically. One of them may have been a senior copyist. DO NOT ORDER VIA A B E AS WE WILL THEN HAVE TO REJECT YOUR ORDER. Instead order via www.Antiqbook . Weight: 20 lbs. (ISBN: 9780712349987) .
Thornton's BookshopProfessional seller
Book number: F1735
GBP 350.00 [Appr.: EURO 383.25 US$ 450.56 | JP¥ 49199]
Catalogue: Theology
Keywords: Facsimile Theology Ancient Near East Palestine Bible 9780712349987

 
LEE, SAMUEL,
New Testament in Syriac
. The text, written in Estrangela script, is pointed according to the Eastern Syriac system of vocalisation (similar in concept to the pointing of the Hebrew Masoritic text). The text of the frontspiece reads: New Testament, i.e. the book of the Holy Gospel of Our Lord and Our God, Jesus Christ. The 5 lines of the sub-script read: It was printed in London, a city fortified by God that is the metropolis of the land of England. And through the expenses of men believing in Jesus Christ who partook/participated in the printing of holy books for themselves and also for foreigners. This book was printed for the sake of the eastern Syriac believers in Jesus Christ. And it was emended according to old Syriac manuscripts in the year 1816 of Our Lord. The reference to "for themselves and also for foreigners" indicates that the book was published through the auspices of the British and Foreign Bible Society The University Library, Cambridge catalogue lists a New Testament that was published in 1816 by R. Watts for the British and Foreign Bible Society. The earliest Syriac script is called Estrangela, and the name is derived from the Greek word strongulos meaning 'rounded'. In a contemp. panelled full calf binding rebacked at a later date with a title label.
¶ SAMUEL LEE was born May 14th, 1783. Syriac was the seventh language for Samuel Lee. He learned it through a project he did for the British and Foreign Bible Society . He was commissioned to produce a Syriac New Testament for the Malabar Syriac Archbishop and his diocese. It was published in 1816 when Lee was 33 years of age. It was the beginning a great scholarly career. He produced twenty three major publications. Three of these works were specific contributions to Syriac studies: the Syriac New Testament, the Syriac Old Testament, and Eusebius’ Theophania.
Thornton's BookshopProfessional seller
Book number: F3122
GBP 350.00 [Appr.: EURO 383.25 US$ 450.56 | JP¥ 49199]
Catalogue: Bible Studies
Keywords: Ancient Near East Syriac Bible New Testament

 
POLYBIOS,
Geschichte
0. 1858. Übersetzt von R. A.Haakh. Stuttgart, Hoffmann, 1858-60; bound as two volumes; VI, 1-288, [ii], 289-488, 132pp.; near contemporary half black cloth over marbled boards, spines lettered in gilt.; a few light pencil annotations, one short section more heavily annotated. A very good set, despite the neat annotations mentioned. At the beginning of the work the binder has used the title-page intended for the first two Books only: the title-page issued later for Books I - V is bound in at the end of Book V, and before the separately-paginated Book VI.
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Book number: IS002259
GBP 25.00 [Appr.: EURO 27.5 US$ 32.18 | JP¥ 3514]
Keywords: Ianweb Ancient Greece Ancient Rome Ancient Near East Ancient History Classics Classical History German Translations Qntiquarian

 
ROBERTS, DAVID
The Holy Land and Egypt and Nubia. 2 Volumes
. Edition of 1,000, hand-numbered on a special limitation page in both volumes. 2 magnificent volumes measuring 20" x 13 ¾" published by the Folio Society. Bound in full canvas cloth printed silkscreen in black and gold. Designs by Neil Gower derived from Roberts’s originals. Gilded top edges, ribbon marker. All 247 Lithographs In The First Ever Large-scale Reproduction. ‘One of the richest folios that ever left the East’ David Roberts was an artist with ambition. Born in relative poverty outside Edinburgh, he spent years developing his skills as an apprentice and a jobbing artisan, graduating to a career painting backdrops for the theatre, first in Edinburgh and then in London’s Covent Garden and Drury Lane. By 1837, he had achieved renown for his landscape paintings of the Rhine and Spain. Unlike most artists, who relied on sketches brought back by other travellers, Roberts had visited these countries himself. His adventurous approach and his technical brilliance would serve him well on the journey of a lifetime – an artistic pilgrimage to Egypt and the Holy Land, the first ever undertaken by a British artist. Roberts set off in August 1838, travelling from London to Marseilles and on to Alexandria. From there he began his journey up the Nile with a crew of six men. He was awestruck by the landscape - 'I cannot express my feelings on seeing these vast monuments' - and sketched the sights that caught his eye, whether a group of crocodiles or architectural wonders such as the Temples of Dendera and Karnak, and the pyramids of Gizeh, which reminded him of the 'instability of all human greatness'. In Cairo, he determined to record modern buildings as well as ancient, and made sketches of minarets, alleys and market places. His observations remain among the few records we have of the early 19th-century city. Thanks to the intervention of the Viceroy of Egypt, Muhammad Ali, Roberts became one of the first Westerners ever to set foot in a mosque and sketch the interior, making sure to discard his hog's-hair brushes before entering. Ultimately continuing as far south as Abu Simbel, Roberts produced over 100 sketches on his journey through Egypt: 'We shall see what impression they make in England.'Roberts next set his sights on Palestine. He travelled across the Sinai desert along the route thought to have been taken by the Israelites when they left Egypt for the Promised Land. He and his team rode camels, wore Turkish costume and carried pistols, rifles and sabres, as much as a disguise as for protection. They slept in tents under the stars and took shelter in the Monastery of St Catherine, where Roberts produced some of his most famous vistas of the Holy Land. Jerusalem was closed to visitors because of plague, but Roberts's luck held and he was able to enter during Holy Week, along with a throng of pilgrims from all over the world: Syrians, Armenians, Copts and Greek Orthodox, 'a vast congregation gathered by one powerful impulse to do homage to the most awe-filled place of recollection on the globe'. For Roberts, it was a memorable culmination to an extraordinary voyage. As well as having visited biblical sites from the Mount of Olives to Jericho, he had assembled, as he put it, 'one of the richest folios that ever left the East'. David Roberts was the first British painter to make an artistic expedition to Egypt and the Holy Land. The result of his travels was a picturesque vision of the Near East that has been hugely influential ever since. Nearly 200 years later, his work is held in institutions such as the Library of Congress in Washington and London's Victoria and Albert Museum. This new Folio Society limited edition reproduces all 247 of his lithographs for the first time on this scale. On his return to London, Roberts sought a publisher for his work, eventually signing a contract with Francis G. Moon for £3,000 - an enormous sum, the equivalent of over £200,000 today. Critics and the public lined up to praise Roberts's works when they were first exhibited. The press lauded the aesthetic quality of his art, its historical and topographical accuracy, and the grandeur of its subject matter. Publication of the first edition was a slow and enormously expensive process. It was printed in sections, each one containing six hand-coloured lithographs created from the original drawings. But Moon's investment paid off. There was no shortage of subscribers, with Queen Victoria (to whom the Holy Land series is dedicated) and Charles Dickens among those reserving a set. Roberts's pictures had caught the imagination of the British public and set a trend for Orientalism in art that would continue to shape the way in which the West perceived the East. Because of its scale, and the scarcity of complete first editions, Roberts's work has rarely been reproduced in its entirety and never before on this scale. In this Folio Society limited edition, all 247 lithographs have been reproduced from one of the few complete hand-coloured copies, held at the John Rylands Library in Manchester.
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Book number: F1780
GBP 1350.00 [Appr.: EURO 1477.5 US$ 1737.87 | JP¥ 189769]
Catalogue: Antiquarian Rare
Keywords: Egypt Folio Society

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